fission product


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fission product

[′fish·ən ‚präd·əkt]
(nuclear physics)
Any radioactive or stable nuclide resulting from fission, including both primary fission fragments and their radioactive decay products.
References in periodicals archive ?
Additional protection could be obtained using a variant of the UREX+ process that mixed certain radioactive fission products in with the plutonium and the minor actinides.
That process has been extensively studied, and it does a tremendous job of scrubbing nearly all of the most dangerous fission products from the atmosphere, so that they never get out of the containment building.
As Sakharov relates in his Memoirs, he worried so much about bomb-test fallout that in 1958 he made two remarkable predictions--that ingested fission products would cause many deaths (extrapolating from his figures, perhaps as many as 1 million premature deaths worldwide for every 50 megatons of bomb-test yield) and that the radiation would accelerate the mutation of all microorganisms.
In these individuals, the number of secondary spermatocytes with the fission products (acrocentric elements) was significantly greater than those with the metacentric element.
Some of the fission products must remain isolated for several hundred years, but there is no need for Yucca Mountain-type repositories intended to last millennia.
Nuclear reactor safety focuses on providing multiple containment barriers and reliable cooling to allow for the safe radioactive decay of short-lived fission products after reactor shutdown.
131]I but also to a mixture of other fission products.
The research is focused on risks associated with high-level radioactive fission products.
I participated in studies at Battelle in the 1970's that showed that the fuel can be reprocessed in such a way that the vast majority of the long-lived fission products, including the transuranic materials, such as plutonium, can be recycled and successfully used as a new reactor fuel material.
Beyond normal operation, in the remote possibility of loss of control, even PBMRs producing somewhat more thermal power than the reactor planned by Eskom can withstand any series of failures without releasing fission products.
The 1986 Chernobyl nuclear accident released large quantities of radioactive fission products over vast areas of the Ukraine, Belarus, and Russia.
Because the fragments move at nearly the uranium beam's velocity and because they are totally stripped of electrons, "the fission products are much easier to detect than in previous experiments," Bernas explains.