fission-track dating


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fission-track dating

[′fish·ən ‚trak ‚dād·iŋ]
(geology)
A method of dating geological specimens by counting the radiation-damage tracks produced by spontaneous fission of uranium impurities in minerals and glasses.
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and Green, P.F.: 1983, The zeta age calibration of fission-track dating. Chemical Geology, 41, 285-317.
Naeser, C.W.: 1979, Fission-track dating and geological annealing of fission tracks.
and Van Den Haute, P.: 1992, Fission-Track Dating. Solid Earth Sciences Library, Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht, 285 pp.
Fission-track dating is another method that is used in conjunction with the K-Ar, [sup.40]Ar/[sup.39]Ar, and U-Th/He methods for reconstruction of the uplift and cooling histories of mountain belts.
As a result, the simplest application of fission-track dating concerns minerals or glasses that have not been re-heated subsequent to their original formation.
Fission-track dating of titanite from layer 4 yielded an age of 306,000 years, and titanite from layer 10 yielded an age of 462,000 years, consistent with the stratigraphy.