Fistulography

Fistulography

 

a method of roentgenologic examination of a fistula. An X ray is taken after a contrast medium is introduced under aseptic conditions through the external opening of the fistula. The contrast medium is usually an aqueous or oil solution of an organic compound of iodine, such as Urotrast or Verografin (diatrizoate sodium), or iodized oil. Fistulography is used to determine the length, shape, and direction of a fistula and its relation to a hollow organ (such as stomach, intestine, or bile duct), as well as to a foreign body or a focus of inflammation; this enables the physician to select the appropriate therapy.

References in periodicals archive ?
further possible application areas: - urography, - computed tomography, - angiography, - digital subtraction angiography (dsa), - angiocardiography, coronary arteriography, interventional coronary arteriography, - fistulography, galactography.
Conventional contrast material-enhanced fistulography was the first modality used in the diagnosis of perianal fistula.
Fistulography can be performed to determine the depth of the cyst before surgery.[1] As in the classic plenoidal sinus, the width of the surgery can be determined perioperatively with methylene blue injection.[12] Since the lesion content, size, and healthy tissue differentiation can be determined clearly, ultrasonography is also used to assist the diagnosis and in determining the width of the surgery.
Fistulography of the left iliac fossa emphasized opacification of the sigmoid loop with inflammatory changes and incomplete lumen stenosis over a distance of approximately 10 cm.
Postoperatively, a subvesical duct injury may be diagnosed via fistulography [12].
Fistulography via X-ray or CT using a gutta-percha usually provides the diagnosis when all other modalities fail [2, 4].
The patients had been referred to the MRI unit for MR fistulography.
In all patients, direct X-rays, MCUG, fistulography, and computed tomography of the whole abdomen, MRI, USG, and colonography with a water-soluble contrast agent should be performed to detect concurrent anomalies (6).
The tracts were also clearly seen during fistulography (figure, C and D).
Fistulography revealed a connection with the duodenal [Figure 1], but the patient refused surgery.
Since 1921 following the discovery of X-ray by Wilhem Roentgen, the radiopaque property of LPD hasbeen exploited for radiological diagnoses in lymphangiography, hysterosalpingography, sialography, and fistulography [1].