fixed-length record

fixed-length record

[¦fikst ‚leŋkth ′rek·ərd]
(computer science)
One of a file of records, each of which must have the same specified number of data units, such as blocks, words, characters, or digits.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The files on the EWIRDB are each in the form of a fixed-length record of 130 bytes each.
The main loop of the constant-activity program (lines 60-200) writes and then reads a fixed-length record and displays the cumulative mean and standard deviation of the times between transactions.
Learn how to process a range of data pieces in all kinds of formats from XML to fixed-length records using a guide that even helps reuse existing C, C++, Java and other codes.
Aimed at programmers and web developers who need to streamline data libraries, large software projects and middleware, this book offers tutorials on employing XML, CSV, fixed-length records and JSON formats to save time while still using code from C, C++, Java and .NET.
Data processing systems seem to have followed the same rule in perpetuating the Proccrustean bed of the "unit record." Virtually all commercial applications in the 1960's were based on files of fixed-length records of multiple fields, which were selected and merged.
Fixed-length records work well for a number of reasons, particularly when space is not a consideration.
Fixed-format, fixed-field, fixed-length records are exploited by database management systems that store and locate data.
Fixed-Field, Fixed-Length Records dBASE databases are fixed-field, fixed-length files.
For one thing you can convert your records to fixed-length records, and import your new fixed-length files into a database program such as dBASE, or you can hold your horses until you're ready to go online.