fjord


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

fjord

or

fiord

(fyôrd), steep-sided inlet of the sea characteristic of glaciated regions. Fjords probably resulted from the scouring by glaciers of valleys formed by any of several processes, including faulting and erosion by running water. When the regions occupied by these glaciers subsided, the valleys were drowned by the sea. The fjord coast lines of Norway, Scotland, Greenland, Alaska, British Columbia, S Chile, S New Zealand, and Antarctica are examples. A fjord differs from most estuaries in its sheer, parallel walls, often extending far below the water surface, and in its many branches of similar form. Often shallow at the mouth, fjords are frequently very deep farther inland. Sognafjord (Norway) is 4,000 ft (1,220 m) deep and over 100 mi (160 km) long. Loch Moran, Scotland (1,017 ft/310 m), is a typical fjord but is separated from the sea. Norwegian fjords are noted for their grandeur.

Fjord

 

a narrow, winding, deep inlet in a mountainous coast. Its length is often dozens of times greater than its width. The sides of fjords are steep, even vertical, becoming less steep in the upper walls; the floor is highly irregular. The longest known fjord, Sognafjorden, is 204 km long, 1.5–6 km wide, and up to 1,208 m deep. Fjords are often separated from the open sea by a sill. They represent ancient erosion or tectonic valleys that underwent scouring by mountain glaciers, which deepened the floor, and that were subsequently inundated by postglacial transgression. Fjords are found only at high latitudes where Pleistocene glaciers formed or modern glaciers exist; they are found on the coasts of Norway, Spitsbergen, Greenland, the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, Novaia Zemlia, Taimyr, the Chukchi Peninsula, New Zealand, and Patagonia.

fjord

[fyȯrd]
(geography)
A narrow, deep inlet of the sea between high cliffs or steep slopes. Also spelled fiord.

fjord

, fiord
(esp on the coast of Norway) a long narrow inlet of the sea between high steep cliffs formed by glacial action
References in periodicals archive ?
Norwegian ferry owners have been at the forefront of ship technology for many years, and seek environmentally friendly and reliable solutions for traveling in the Norwegian fjords and along the coastline.
When our group arrived in Geiranger, a visit to the Norwegian Fjord Centre showed me how fjords themselves are formed, as glaciers wear valleys into the mountains, which fill with a mixture of salt water from the sea, melted glacier water.
And we were particularly fortunate to make the journey on a fantastically clear day, as the sunlight framed the fjord perfectly.
Boudicca will then spend time cruising through the peaceful waters of Naeroyfjord; the narrowest fjord in the world, stretching just 250 metres across, at certain points.
When the fjord filled up again with herring this year, the researchers came up with innovative sonic solutions to try and enourage the fish to swim away, one being the playing of 'Brown Sugar' and 'Satisfaction'.
Bremanger is a small municipality in Fjord Norway with around 4000 inhabitants, situated between the open sea to the west and the fjords of Norway to the east and south.
They scraped together enough money to charter a do-it-themselves research vessel--the 24-foot-long boat of Arqaluk Jorgensen, a telephone technician and part-time fisherman from Tasiilaq, the nearest village to Sermilik Fjord.
There are also a number of sites in the southern fjord with deeper house depressions and more substantial middens.
This lightweight appearance mediates between Aker Brygge's heavier masonry and the shimmering fjord.
I knew I had struck gold when I discovered the Norwegian Fjord horse.
The Gerainger Fjord is gorgeous and unspoiled, its sides laced with waterfalls, its forests sprinkled with remote farmhouses, most of them long since abandoned.