flammability


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Related to flammability: Flammability limits

flammability

[‚flam·ə′bil·əd·ē]
(chemistry)
A measure of the extent to which a material will support combustion. Also known as inflammability.

flammability

A material’s ability to burn or support combustion.
References in periodicals archive ?
* Engineered fire-safe products: To enable the development of technologies that yield products compliant with flammability regulations for their entire lifetime; and,
The FTFR rule requires fuel tank ignition sources and flammability exposure to be reduced in aircraft most at risk.
Customer advice: Primark said: "Following an investigation it has come to our attention that the Supersoft Cushions do not meet Primark's flammability standards."
Therefore, throughout this discussion it's important to keep in mind that flammability is a continuum and not a set of absolutes as determined by Standard 34.
For each sample, the upper temperature limit of flammability (the temperature at and below which flammable mixtures were formed) was measured using a specialized test method in which small rectangular combustion chambers were refrigerated while filled to 5% volume with the test fuel (intended to simulate a vehicle fuel tank at it's minimum fill level).
"This petition provides the CPSC with an opportunity to bring closure to the longstanding issue of furniture flammability," states Bill Perdue, AHFA's vice president of regulatory affairs.
"It fully complies with EN71, the British nightwear flammability regulations and the very high safety standards we set."
This move is perhaps being driven by the revised California flammability standard which went into effect Jan.
Toyota Motor Corporation (NYSE: TM)(LSE: TYT)(TYO: 7203), a Japan-based automaker, is likely to face another potential recall as the seat fabric used in several car models may not comply with flammability regulations.
Flammability is comprised of (i) ignitibility--the fuel ignition delay once exposed to heat, (ii) sustainability--the measure of how well a fire will continue to burn with or without the heat source, (iii) combustibility--the reflection of the rapidity with which a fire burns [14], and (iv) consumability--the proportion of mass or volume consumed by fire (Martin et al.
[17] have been investigating flammability of various sets of polymeric composites together with multiwalled nanotubes composition.
The flammability of subalpine forests and woodlands dominated by Snowgum Eucalyptus pauciflora and Alpine Snowgum E.