flapper


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flapper

(in the 1920s) a young woman, esp one flaunting her unconventional dress and behaviour
References in periodicals archive ?
New Zealand's Mutton Birds famously flew 1,200 miles to play a gig at the Flapper & Firkin, as it was previously known.
Organisers say it is a great opportunity for the men to grab their flat caps and the ladies to don their flapper dresses and take a trip back in time.
The Flapper And Firkin pub, on Cambrian Wharf - close to the Barclaycard Arena - is set to be demolished to make way for 80 new apartments.
The zigzag fur coats were worn over lace flapper dresses.
He has looked like a 20s flapper since coming to town and Karl Darlow must wonder what he has done wrong after keeping goal for Rafa during a six-match unbeaten PL run at the end of last season.
While Celia is in Germany confronting her past, something happens - and it of obsessed with Celia and I had to carry on her story, as she becomes a 20s girl and a flapper, and tries to find out the truth of her family.
The toilet flapper was the culprit the majority of the time.
From gangsters to flapper girls, the line covers this rich heritage.
Finally, the lineup ends with a list of Ten Things that started new fashion trends, again, arranged chronologically: The Industrial Revolution (1760-1840), the Ballets Russes and Paul Poiret (1910), World War I (19-14-1918), the Jazz Age and flapper fashions (1920s), Chanel (1920s-1930s), World War II (1939-1945), Rock 'n' roll and the teenager (1950s), Mary Quant miniskirt (1960s), Punk (1970s-1980s), and the Internet (1990s-2000s).
The 16mm ASCO 068 Series flapper isolation solenoid valve features high hroughput, smaller sample sizes and reduced calibration requirements for clinical and analytical instruments.
Lucy Bland, Modern Women on Trial: Sexual Transgression in the Age of the Flapper, Manchester and New York, Manchester University Press, 2013, 246pp, 17.