flare


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Related to flare: solar flare

flare

1. Optics
a. the unwanted light reaching the image region of an optical device by reflections inside the instrument, etc.
b. the fogged area formed on a negative by such reflections
2. Astronomy short for solar flare
3. Aeronautics the final transition phase of an aircraft landing, from the steady descent path to touchdown

Flare

 

a signal or illuminating rocket, used by troops for mutual identification, target indication, transmission of commands, and short-term illumination of the terrain.

Signal and illuminating rockets are identical in design and differ only by what is called the star, which contains a pyrotechnic compound appropriate to the purpose. The flare has a cardboard casing with a metal bottom and is filled with a propelling charge, the star, and wadding (for packing). The star is fired from a special flare pistol or launched by hand using the attachment on the bottom of the cartridge. It burns for five to seven seconds and has a radius of illumination of 100 m; it may project a signal, the color of which depends on the pyrotechnic compound. The rocket is visible at night for distances of up to 7 km and during the day for up to 2 km.

flare

[fler]
(aerospace engineering)
To descend in a smooth curve, making a transition from a relatively steep descent to a direction substantially parallel to the surface, when landing an aircraft.
(astronomy)
A bright eruption from the sun's chromosphere; flares may appear within minutes and fade within an hour, cover a wide range of intensity and size, and tend to occur between sunspots or over their penumbrae.
(chemical engineering)
A device for disposing of combustible gases from refining or chemical processes by burning in the open, in contrast to combustion in a furnace or closed vessel or chamber.
(design engineering)
An expansion at the end of a cylindrical body, as at the base of a rocket.
(electronics)
A radar screen target indication having an enlarged and distorted shape due to excessive brightness.
(electromagnetism)
(engineering)
A pyrotechnic item designed to produce a single source of intense light for such purposes as target or airfield illumination.
(naval architecture)
A concave curve of a boat's or ship's sides away from the center line, above the waterline, normally at the bow.

flare

flare
i. A maneuver carried out just before touchdown to reduce the rate of descent, so that the aircraft settles on the runway smoothly and with the least amount of vertical speed. Normally referred to as flare-out.
ii. A magnesium candle supported by a small parachute, which was at one time carried by most aircraft operating at night. This flare was fired if it became necessary to force land. The burning flare produced sufficient light to enable a pilot to see the ground for making a landing. Flares are pyrotechnic devices used for signaling or to provide illumination.
iii. A cone-shaped expansion on the end of tubing. Tubing used in aircraft fluid lines flared at an angle of 37°.
iv. Infrared flares meant to deflect incoming infrared missiles.
v. A waveguide in which one or both transverse dimensions increase toward the aperture. Also called a horn.
vi. As it relates to aerial photography, light reaching the photosensitive emulsion, resulting from internal reflections within the lens, such as occur from a noncoated air-glass lens surface.
References in classic literature ?
They were coming directly toward him and the ape-man saw that should he continue on he would meet them directly at the intersection of the two streets in the full light of the flare.
He had almost emerged from the shadow of the arcade into the full light of the flare and the approaching men were but a few yards from him, when he suddenly kneeled and pretended to adjust the wrappings of his sandals--wrappings, which, by the way, he was not at all sure that he had adjusted as their makers had intended them to be adjusted.
The street became a little straighter just before he reached the next flare, and as he came within sight of it he saw silhouetted against a patch of light the figure of a lion.
To prosecute his search for the young officer and the girl he must be able to move about the city as freely as possible, but to pass beneath one of the corner flares, naked as he was except for a loin cloth, and in every other respect markedly different from the inhabitants of the city, would be but to court almost immediate discovery.
Here the number of flares was increased so that they appeared not only at street intersections but midway between as well, and there were many more people abroad.
The sergeant who shot him fancied that he heard voices on the creek, and crept up to the wall just before the flare came.
He walked to the companion and stooping low to put the flare in its usual place saw in the darkness the motionless pale oval of Mrs.
Then he remembered that the flare might have scorched her face, and expressed his concern.
But she doesn't look it," he thought in extenuation and was going to say something more to her about the lighting of that flare when another voice was heard in the companion, saying some indistinct words.
cried the boy, seeming to be rather relieved by this default on the part of the hollow down by the flare.
Your library of books is the hollow down by the flare, I think.
The latest set of governments and companies committing to end routine gas flaring in existing oil fields and to no longer routinely flare in new oil fields, include: Germany, Mexico, the Netherlands, Peru, Turkmenistan, the State of California, BP, ETAP (Tunisia), Galp Energia (Portugal), KazMunayGaz (Kazakhstan), Niger Delta Petroleum Resources (Nigeria), Indias Oil and Natural Gas Corporation Limited (ONGC), Seven Energy (Nigeria), Sonangol (Angola) and Wintershall (Germany).