flare


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Related to flare: solar flare

flare

1. Optics
a. the unwanted light reaching the image region of an optical device by reflections inside the instrument, etc.
b. the fogged area formed on a negative by such reflections
2. Astronomy short for solar flare
3. Aeronautics the final transition phase of an aircraft landing, from the steady descent path to touchdown

Flare

 

a signal or illuminating rocket, used by troops for mutual identification, target indication, transmission of commands, and short-term illumination of the terrain.

Signal and illuminating rockets are identical in design and differ only by what is called the star, which contains a pyrotechnic compound appropriate to the purpose. The flare has a cardboard casing with a metal bottom and is filled with a propelling charge, the star, and wadding (for packing). The star is fired from a special flare pistol or launched by hand using the attachment on the bottom of the cartridge. It burns for five to seven seconds and has a radius of illumination of 100 m; it may project a signal, the color of which depends on the pyrotechnic compound. The rocket is visible at night for distances of up to 7 km and during the day for up to 2 km.

flare

[fler]
(aerospace engineering)
To descend in a smooth curve, making a transition from a relatively steep descent to a direction substantially parallel to the surface, when landing an aircraft.
(astronomy)
A bright eruption from the sun's chromosphere; flares may appear within minutes and fade within an hour, cover a wide range of intensity and size, and tend to occur between sunspots or over their penumbrae.
(chemical engineering)
A device for disposing of combustible gases from refining or chemical processes by burning in the open, in contrast to combustion in a furnace or closed vessel or chamber.
(design engineering)
An expansion at the end of a cylindrical body, as at the base of a rocket.
(electronics)
A radar screen target indication having an enlarged and distorted shape due to excessive brightness.
(electromagnetism)
(engineering)
A pyrotechnic item designed to produce a single source of intense light for such purposes as target or airfield illumination.
(naval architecture)
A concave curve of a boat's or ship's sides away from the center line, above the waterline, normally at the bow.

flare

flare
i. A maneuver carried out just before touchdown to reduce the rate of descent, so that the aircraft settles on the runway smoothly and with the least amount of vertical speed. Normally referred to as flare-out.
ii. A magnesium candle supported by a small parachute, which was at one time carried by most aircraft operating at night. This flare was fired if it became necessary to force land. The burning flare produced sufficient light to enable a pilot to see the ground for making a landing. Flares are pyrotechnic devices used for signaling or to provide illumination.
iii. A cone-shaped expansion on the end of tubing. Tubing used in aircraft fluid lines flared at an angle of 37°.
iv. Infrared flares meant to deflect incoming infrared missiles.
v. A waveguide in which one or both transverse dimensions increase toward the aperture. Also called a horn.
vi. As it relates to aerial photography, light reaching the photosensitive emulsion, resulting from internal reflections within the lens, such as occur from a noncoated air-glass lens surface.
References in periodicals archive ?
Expect everything to be an A++ with the Cherry Mobile Flare S6 Plus, the flagship of the newest Flare S6 series.
With the installation of the new flare, the system of injection wells can be expanded, Schimke said, collecting more gas before it escapes.
Flare Kids was designed with parents and children in mind.
The integrated Total Safety Flare Services group is capable of flaring - and monitoring - almost any type of gas product at a minimum 98.
SLAP FLARES ARE A VALUABLE TOOL IN COMBAT, ALLOWING YOU TO SIGNAL YOUR POSITION TO YOUR FELLOW SOLDIERS.
The X-ray flux from a solar flare usually rises quickly to a peak, and then decays more slowly.
Prestige flares feature no drill installation, stainless steel rivets, innovative rubber trimming, and a robotic-laser trimming process, making the flare fit smoothly and mold up snugly to the body of the pickup.
The National Institute of Justice (NIJ) funded a study that assessed alternative highway flares that use chemical or electric sources of energy, thus reducing the risks posed by traditional flares.
TUV NEL senior consultant Lynn Hunter explains there are massive challenges with gas flare measurement as the science is not up to the standard required by regulators.
He said: "It has an expiry date that tells the user they can be confident that the flare will work at sea.
Woodward, 22, of Dumfries, admitted having the flare - which was banned by festival bosses - in the Radio 1/NME stage at Balado and placing other people at risk of injury.
4 mg/dL, a mean of seven gout flares in the prior year, and a mean gout flare duration of 3.