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flash

1. Chemistry a volatile mixture of inorganic salts used to produce a glaze on bricks or tiles
2. 
a. a sudden rush of water down a river or watercourse
b. a device, such as a sluice, for producing such a rush
3. Photog informal short for flashlight, flash photography
4. Engineering a ridge of thin metal or plastic formed on a moulded object by the extrusion of excess material between dies
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Flash

 

a fin on a casting or stamping. Flash around a casting is generated along the parting line of the casting mold in the process of filling the mold with molten metal. Flash is cut off during fettling of the casting. Flash around a stamping is produced by extrusion of excess metal from open dies and is cut off in trimming presses.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

flash

[flash]
(astronomy)
A thermal instability that occurs in late stages of stellar evolution, according to numerical calculations.
(engineering)
In plastics or rubber molding or in metal casting, that portion of the charge which overflows from the mold cavity at the joint line.
(metallurgy)
A fin of excess metal along the mold joint line of a casting, occurring between mating die faces of a forging or expelled from a joint in resistance welding.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

flash

1. A color variation on the surface of a brick, produced intentionally or otherwise, due to surface fusion or vitrification of a film of different texture.
2. Abbr. for flashing.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Flash

(file format, World-Wide Web)
(Or "Shockwave Flash") A file format for delivering interactive vector graphics and animation on the World-Wide Web, developed by Macromedia.

http://macromedia.com/software/flash/.

flash

(2)
1. <chat> A program which allows one to flood another Unix user's terminal with garbage, through exploiting a common security hole in the victim's host's talk daemon. Users with "messages off" (mesg n) and users on systems running fixed talk daemons, or not running talk daemons at all, are immune.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

flash

(1) The most common non-volatile storage technology. See flash memory.

(2) A telephone button. See flash button.

(3) To install a different mobile OS. See Android ROM.

(4) (Flash) A multimedia authoring and playback system from Adobe. Flash content is created in authoring applications, such as Flash MX and Flash Professional, and viewed in any computer that has the Adobe Flash Player installed. Flash animations support space-efficient vector images, which download quickly; a feature that helped catapult Flash to success when dial-up access was the norm (see vector graphics).

Once the primary format for animations and video clips on the Web, Flash was never permitted on Apple's mobile devices. Many sites, including YouTube, switched from Flash to HTML5 for multimedia. In addition, Google dropped the built-in Flash player for Android in 2012. See HTML5.

Animations Are Choreographed
To create an animation, the Flash designer imports graphics, sound and video elements created in other applications, places them on sequential timelines and defines their interaction. The timelines and elements are saved in an .FLA source file and published to an .SWF file for playback (see SWF).

Flash Movies: Animations and Video
Flash also provides a video format that uses the .FLV extension. Although animations in Flash (SWFs) are technically "Flash movies," and videos in Flash (FLVs) are "Flash videos," both are called "Flash movies." SWF files may contain some video, but FLV files are all video. See Flash video.

Flash Applications
As of Flash Version 5, Flash became fully programmable, enabling the creation of interactive Web-based applications (see Flex). Flash was created by Macromedia and introduced in 1996. In 2005, Adobe acquired the company.


Animation Authoring
Objects are placed in separate timelines that move in sequence. Although this software has basic drawing and painting tools (top left), multimedia elements are typically imported.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Yakuza and Mafia heads roll in a flashily filmed action thriller in thrall to the cinema of John Woo.
He's sensational, as are Streep as the Mormon mother, Rosenberg and, unrecognizably, an Old World male rabbi in the opening sequence; Wright as the deeply sensitive and profoundly extravagant Belize and, less flashily, as Harper's travel agent to Antarctica, and, in a quieter vein, Parker as the spaced-out abandoned wife.
Not as flashily bred as some in this list, but plenty to like about her pedigree.
Flashily lensed yet stillborn enterprise saddles an otherwise talented cast with an ill-conceived script rendered insufferable via grating execution.
This ferocious gangster epic is flashily directed by Martin Scorsese.
Problem is director Pang can't keep his finger off the hype button for very long, with flashily edited sequences and a pounding music track elbowing their way into the story at regular intervals.
Ferocious gangster epic, flashily directed by Martin Scorsese.
And editing is becoming more celebrated, in flashily edited pics such as "Moulin Rouge," "Black Hawk Down" and "Gladiator."
Flashily duded-out leads Ehobor and Rondelli, both making their screen bows, are part of pic's incredible pop-art surface created by cinematographer Daniele Cipri.
Directed flashily and at a level of unvarying hysteria.