flatcar


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flatcar

[′flat‚kär]
(engineering)
A railroad car without fixed walls or a cover.
References in periodicals archive ?
Since nearly all tank cars are private cars, the military's fleet ownership costs were fairly well compensated until the boxcar and flatcar purchases during the Korean War.
With no teams available, the Worcester firefighters muscled the heavy pumpers off the flatcars and pushed them down Washington Street where they began to pour water on the walls still standing.
That poor little boy--he's so hideously thin and yellow, like one of those wrecks lying on a flatcar in Dachau.
1 the accelerometer have been rigidly connected with a prismatic block, placed on the flatcar of the considered vehicle.
I worked for two dollars per sixteen-hour day and slept two to a bunk, three bunks high, on the train, or else could rattle through the night outside on a flatcar. The faces of the drifters I was with sometimes looked as grim and bitter as a WANTED poster, and quite at their wit's end, not having had much wit to begin with, and what they might have had perhaps dispelled in prison.
Mounted on a railroad flatcar, it was protected in front by a sloping iron-plated shield through which a porthole had been cut for the muzzle of the gun.
The flatcar with tables and benches kept food hot, with electricity generated by the same hydroelectric system used to run the railroad and light the tunnel.
The container is moved by crane or forklift to and from a truck bed trailer, a railroad flatcar or a ship compartment.
Hobos call it "the drift"--it's the trance-like feeling you get staring at the horizon for hours out of the doors of a boxcar, or watching the clouds pass by as you look up from your bed on a flatcar.
Crowded onto a platform that doubles as a railroad flatcar and an executioner's scaffold, the eight black men stand or kneel; some gesture for help from the viewer, others stoically await death.
Caltrans hired a bridge contractor to build a prototype flatcar bridge based upon Wattenburg's concept.
In 1974, the METRO Board of Consultants stipulated that the IDWS chain-link fence be erected between the two tracks at a constant height of 12 feet above track level so it could warn of derailment or a shifting load of lumber, steel beams or ammunition on a flatcar that could rip open an entire METRO train without either train leaving the track.