flatter

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flatter

1. a blacksmith's tool, resembling a flat-faced hammer, that is placed on forged work and struck to smooth the surface of the forging
2. a die with a narrow rectangular orifice for drawing flat sections
References in periodicals archive ?
These include comparisons of flatterers to counterfeit coins, or the reports of how followers of Plato and of Alexander the Great imitated even their masters' postures.
Thus they will be inwardly calm and at peace and neither stirred by praise of flatterers nor stung by the follies of unlearned mockers of learning." As Wegemer explains, "More's fundamental principle in education was crystal-clear: 'Put virtue in the first place..., learning in the second.'"
Nearly every society, it seems, prepared some sort of handbook for flatterers. The ancient Egyptian writer Ptahhotep, for example, offered a compendium of advice about how to ingratiate yourself with the Pharaoh, including this memorable admonition: "Laugh after he laughs, and it will be very pleasing to his heart." That one has always worked well for me, I must say.
West shows Richard as the weak king he was - a boy thrust to prominence before his time and surrounded by flatterers and ill-assorted hangers- on.
The shameless shepherding of flatterers, reprobates, and misfits signals his decadence; Nietzsche recruits scions from the fringes of society instead of fostering his militia from within the latently noble ranks (chap.
1They're good flatterers. If they can make a burned-out piece of metal sound attractive, think what they can do for your self-confidence when you're having a bad day.
That the audience found Northumberland's lines 'The king is not himself, but basely led / By flatterers' highly topical given Walpole's influence over George II is evident from Thomas Davies's account: 'the noise from the clapping of hands and chattering of sticks was loud and boisterous'.
Finally, in 421, the year Aristophanes won second prize at the Dionysia for his Peace, first prize was awarded to Eupolis for The Flatterers.(14) Surviving fragments and comments on the play suggest a symposiastic scene at Callias' house with Protagoras and Alcibiades present.(15) The drama shows that Callias had just recently come into his inheritance.(16) Ancient sources attest that Eupolis' objectives were to deride Callias for having squandered his patrimony, committed adultery, and paid damages for it, as well as for falling prey to flatterers at his dinner-parties, where the prizes consisted of cups, courtesans, and other low and slavish pleasures.(17) Athenaeus had read both Eupolis' Flatterers and Plato's Protagoras, and he comments on them:
He was only trying to make a point to his flatterers: some things are beyond control.
What modest interest it has lies in the power its analysis can sometimes command and in recurrent moments of rhetorical effectiveness like the comparison of flatterers to scorpions (rightly commended by the editor) or the passage on avarice--the latter translated with a deftness Professor Mroczkowski by no means maintains throughout, though such a changeling phrase as 'he shall copy to himself the Deuteronomy of this law' has to be laid at the door of the Douai Version.
Just as Proust observed artists/esthetes who, when they reached a certain age, preferred to surround themselves with flatterers, flirts, and disciples than with "equals," I realized that Karen, of course, is obeying this esthetic law not with people but with art.
The baleful effects of Marie Antoinette's forays into national politics show all too clearly the dangers of allowing strong-willed but foolish and ignorant consorts to believe what flatterers tell them.