flaw

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flaw

1
Law an invalidating fault or defect in a document or proceeding

flaw

2
a. a sudden short gust of wind; squall
b. a spell of bad, esp windy, weather

flaw

[flȯ]
(materials)
A discontinuity in a material beyond acceptable established limits.
(meteorology)
An English nautical term for a sudden gust or squall of wind.
(mineralogy)
A faulty part of a gemstone, such as a crack, visible imperfect crystallization, or internal twinning or cleavage.
(oceanography)
The seaward edge of fast ice.
A shore lead just outside fast ice.
References in classic literature ?
'I see now,' continued Mr Mifflin, 'that there was a flaw in my original plan.
'And a far greater flaw was that it was too altruistic.
'First, are two flawed sapphires - one of two ruttees and one of four as I should judge.
There is one ruby of Burma, of two ruttees, without a flaw, and there is a balas-ruby, flawed, of two ruttees.
Lurgan Sahib had a hawk's eye to detect the least flaw in the make-up; and lying on a worn teak-wood couch, would explain by the half-hour together how such and such a caste talked, or walked, or coughed, or spat, or sneezed, and, since
You have not yet picked out the flaw in my definition of philosophy.
What is this trifle to this handful of old first families of Shechem who can name their fathers straight back without a flaw for thousands-- straight back to a period so remote that men reared in a country where the days of two hundred years ago are called "ancient" times grow dazed and bewildered when they try to comprehend it!
The finest composition of human nature, as well as the finest china, may have a flaw in it; and this, I am afraid, in either case, is equally incurable; though, nevertheless, the pattern may remain of the highest value.
Its size made it a phenomenon in the diamond market; its colour placed it in a category by itself; and, to add to these elements of uncertainty, there was a defect, in the shape of a flaw, in the very heart of the stone.
The flawed Diamond, cut up, would actually fetch more than the Diamond as it now is; for this plain reason-- that from four to six perfect brilliants might be cut from it, which would be, collectively, worth more money than the large-- but imperfect single stone.
Either his mother's birth had been low, or his mother's reputation was damaged by some hidden flaw with which Mrs.
On the other hand, if the second case supposed were the true one, what had been the flaw in her reputation?