fleet

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fleet

1
1. a number of warships organized as a tactical unit
2. all the warships of a nation
3. a number of aircraft, ships, buses, etc., operating together or under the same ownership

fleet

2
Chiefly Southeastern Brit a small coastal inlet; creek

Fleet

the
1. a stream that formerly ran into the Thames between Ludgate Hill and Fleet Street and is now a covered sewer
2. (formerly) a London prison, esp used for holding debtors

Fleet

 

a combined operational unit of the navies of major countries. Fleets are charged with carrying out tactical and strategic missions in designated theaters of naval operations. The most important missions of a fleet are the destruction of shore targets, the destruction of enemy naval forces at bases and at sea, the transfer and landing of amphibious forces, disruption of the enemy’s supply shipping, the defense of coastal areas from invasion by sea, the defense of friendly supply shipping, and the offshore fire support of land forces.

A fleet consists of large units of various combat arms or services: submarine forces, surface forces, naval aviation, marines, and coastal missile-launching artillery. Fleets are headed by a commander (by a commander in chief in the US Navy). Under his direction are a staff, other command organs, and support services, such as rear services, communications, armament, ship repair, emergency rescue, and hydrographic services. The missions of a fleet are carried out as naval operations and combat engagements conducted independently or in conjunction with large units of other branches of the armed forces. A fleet has a well-developed system of bases and shore-support facilities, which provide berths for ships, repair facilities, and logistical services of all types and in which combat training is carried out.

Small countries with access to the sea have a single fleet, serving as the country’s navy. Major powers, such as the USSR and USA, deploy several fleets, which together constitute the country’s navy.

fleet

[flēt]
(mechanical engineering)
Sidewise movement of a rope or cable when winding on a drum.
(ordnance)
An organization of ships, aircraft, marine forces, and shore-based fleet activities, all under a commander who may exercise operational as well as administrative control.
All naval operating forces.

fleet

i. All aircraft of one type used by the same operator.
ii. The total holding of all aircraft with an operator (e.g., Air India has a fleet of 23 aircraft).
References in periodicals archive ?
Figure 3 shows that X3352 and the reciprocal of [X.sub.3419] (1/[X.sub.3419]) first increase lentamente with the elevated temperature when the temperature is lower than 60.0[degrees]C and then enhance fleetly with further increase of the temperature.
"This includes the 8- and 11-year-olds hanging out of the tree while one of their Bethesbian mothers hands them the family camera, imploring them to get a good shot of the crowd, which includes (which will always include) the kooky, ratty-looking Uncle Sam on stilts, and the patchouli girls fleetly flying around (patchouli girls now span, what, three generations?), and the drum circles, and the dudes carrying a poster that proclaims them as `Mainstream White Guys for Peace.'"
Yet it was not Spicer on the podium for Saturday's triumphant account of Bach's Christmas Oratorio; to immense chagrin, a bug had struck him down, but our disappointment at least was dispelled by the superlative conducting of Jeffrey Skidmore, brought in on the day to conduct a choir much larger than his own Ex Cathedra, and securing from the BBC a reading of athleticism and power, singers fleetly responsive to his buoyant direction and unobtrusively-imposed control.
'You must stay here if you are to remember,' Gerda explained, slipping fleetly through the circle of roses.
Compare Siegfried's 'Wie der Fisch froh in der Fluth schwimmt, Wie der Fink frei sich davon schwingt, Flie ich von hier, Fluthe davon, wie der Wind Uber'n Wald weh ich dahin' ('As the fish fleetly in flood swims, as the finch freely in sky soars, so hence I fly, floating away, like the wind o'er the woods wafted afar' (Siegfried, Act I scene 1) in B flat major.
A horse, or horses, pulling so light a load could run fleetly, much faster than a foot soldier could.
So he said what he had to say - fleetly, lightly, briliantly -and shut up.
The experiments demonstrate that the PC platform is human-machine interface friendly, the sensor system is with high data collection efficiency, the information can be transferred simultaneously without error, and the lower machine platform can respond to the corresponding instructions fleetly. Benefiting from our proposed Sail_4A algorithm, the sail automatic control system adjusts the sail angle of attack automatically with the aid of the sensor system, the PC platform, the communication system, and the drive system of the SUICS.
In cognitive radio networks (CRNs), secondary CR users should fleetly and accurately sense the wideband spectrum, so that they can detect the unused spectrum holes, reconfigure their parameters to utilize the spectrum available, and avoid interference to primary users (PUs) [1, 2].
As a result, the electrostatic repulsion among the polymer chains was rapidly increased and the polymeric network was fleetly expanded.
The opening stretch fleetly documents the role Harvey and a small group of gay buds, who hung out at Harvey's Castro Camera shop, played in transforming the Castro district from an unremarkable working-class neighborhood into the gay Mecca it shortly became.
The choreography, with the exception of a lighthearted, beautifully executed solo by the fleetly precise Alexandrous Ballard and an erotically aerobic pas de deux by Tracy Taylor and Matthew Boyes, was obscured by Canfield's visual concept.