fleet

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fleet

1
1. a number of warships organized as a tactical unit
2. all the warships of a nation
3. a number of aircraft, ships, buses, etc., operating together or under the same ownership

fleet

2
Chiefly Southeastern Brit a small coastal inlet; creek

Fleet

the
1. a stream that formerly ran into the Thames between Ludgate Hill and Fleet Street and is now a covered sewer
2. (formerly) a London prison, esp used for holding debtors
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Fleet

 

a combined operational unit of the navies of major countries. Fleets are charged with carrying out tactical and strategic missions in designated theaters of naval operations. The most important missions of a fleet are the destruction of shore targets, the destruction of enemy naval forces at bases and at sea, the transfer and landing of amphibious forces, disruption of the enemy’s supply shipping, the defense of coastal areas from invasion by sea, the defense of friendly supply shipping, and the offshore fire support of land forces.

A fleet consists of large units of various combat arms or services: submarine forces, surface forces, naval aviation, marines, and coastal missile-launching artillery. Fleets are headed by a commander (by a commander in chief in the US Navy). Under his direction are a staff, other command organs, and support services, such as rear services, communications, armament, ship repair, emergency rescue, and hydrographic services. The missions of a fleet are carried out as naval operations and combat engagements conducted independently or in conjunction with large units of other branches of the armed forces. A fleet has a well-developed system of bases and shore-support facilities, which provide berths for ships, repair facilities, and logistical services of all types and in which combat training is carried out.

Small countries with access to the sea have a single fleet, serving as the country’s navy. Major powers, such as the USSR and USA, deploy several fleets, which together constitute the country’s navy.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

fleet

[flēt]
(mechanical engineering)
Sidewise movement of a rope or cable when winding on a drum.
(ordnance)
An organization of ships, aircraft, marine forces, and shore-based fleet activities, all under a commander who may exercise operational as well as administrative control.
All naval operating forces.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

fleet

i. All aircraft of one type used by the same operator.
ii. The total holding of all aircraft with an operator (e.g., Air India has a fleet of 23 aircraft).
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
The key quality in this side which is often overlooked is their physical prowess, their speed, their fleetness of foot, their strength.
Though their punchlines can often be spotted long before arrival, Bergen and her co-stars haven't lost much in terms of timing and fleetness. In the weeks to come, Murphy will sneak into the White House briefing room to lecture Sarah Huckabee Sanders on withholding information and facts from the people, which Sanders (in a form cobbled together from actual news footage) deems an "inappropriate" outburst.
Fleetness and adaptability in a fast changing digital world are necessary and are less obviously driven by a large holding company structure.
He gave four 9-letter examples: CALLIOPES, CHAINLETS, FLEETNESS and TRUANCIES.
The fleetness of foot demonstrated by Liverpool's front three, Roberto Firmino, Philippe Coutinho and Mohamed Salah meant United were not given a chance to hit anything like top gear.
It is in the scampering department where Bairstow brings an extra dimension to England's one-day skills, with a fleetness of foot that would not be out of place on the wing for his beloved Leeds Rhinos.
Ren, "AMT shift control strategy based on the fleetness changing of the gas pedal aperture," Transactions of the Chinese Society of Agricultural Machinery, vol.
That nobody opted to do it to wee Karamoko on Monday night is down to good fortune rather than the third year pupil's fleetness of foot.
Fleetness of foot on the wrong path never leads to knowledge."
No other global operator - from the Foreign and Commonwealth Office to Scottish Development International can match the Global Chamber Network for market reach, for penetration, for connectivity or for fleetness of foot.
She lifts her head in alarm and runs with almost the fleetness of a deer when she sees our purpose, but the pony is more than her match.
Monotype printmaking's spontaneity and singleness feed this fleetness. Coson applies an even coat of black ink on a plate, then wipes away the substance with scraps of cloth or her fingers, revealing the image.