Physical Exercise

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Physical Exercise

 

elementary body movements that are performed in series and as part of sports and other athletic activities. Physical exercises are systematized for the purpose of physical development. In physical education, exercises based on the movements of human labor, daily life, and battle, including running, walking, jumping, throwing, lifting, and swimming, have been developed and methodologically organized as gymnastics, track and field, weight lifting, athletic games, and touring. The different combinations and systems of physical exercise, the basic elements of sports, are included in programs of physical education at educational institutions and in state physical-culture programs, such as Ready for Labor and Defense of the USSR.

References in periodicals archive ?
A typical class usually includes a 15-minute warm up of flexibility exercises and calisthenics.
Include information on flexibility exercises and the type of assistance (if any) required.
While people with supinated feet need to do flexibility exercises, those falling under the flat category have to do muscle strengthening exercises.
Strength training and flexibility exercises should be routinely performed to maintain optimal bone health.
Participants in EnhanceFitness take part in a series of classes from certified YMCA staff, including proven aerobic, strength training, balance and flexibility exercises that are safe, effective and modifiable for a variety of fitness levels.
Flexibility exercises are a good idea, too, to counteract balance issues that tend to develop as we age.
Load-bearing exercises with light weights should be done first as this burns off excess carbohydrates, followed by flexibility exercises and rounding off with cardio, which burns off fat.
The physical activity program--which took place both at a fitness center (twice a week) and at home (3 to 4 times a week)-- had a daily goal of 30 minutes of walking briskly, 10 minutes of strength training for legs, 10 minutes of balance training, and large muscle group flexibility exercises.
Here are four flexibility exercises to help the deskbound turn good posture into less pain:
The goal was to walk for at least 30 minutes daily at moderate intensity and to perform 10 minutes of lower-extremity strength training with ankle weights, 10 minutes of balance training, and large muscle--group flexibility exercises daily.
Doing flexibility exercises enhances muscle ability to move more fluidly and decrease the chance of injury during more strenuous exercise.