flicker fusion


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flicker fusion

[′flik·ər ‚fyü·zhən]
(physiology)
The tendency to perceive an oscillating or flickering sensory input signal as continuous when the frequency is above a specific threshold frequency.
References in periodicals archive ?
Behavioural assessment of flicker fusion frequency in chicken Galius gallus domesticus.
The main objective of our study is to determine and compare perceived stress score, a battery of cognition function tests, critical flicker fusion frequency (CFFF), simple reaction time (SRT), and choice reaction time (CRT) among the female volunteers and male volunteers.
It is this point--called the critical flicker fusion measure--that indicates the person's level of executive functioning.
At the second stage ophthalmological status (acuity of vision and refraction) was estimated as well as functional (critical flicker fusion frequency -CFFF) electrophysiological (electrosensitivity threshold -EST; electrolabilityEL), phychophysiological (channel capacity- CC, visual information volume -VIV, visual information speed -VIS, efficiency of visual information analysis -EVIA) investigations were carried out [4, 5].
The foveal critical flicker fusion threshold is 10 Hz
Eye's Response at flicker fusion to square-wave modulation of a test field surrounded by a large steady field of equal mean luminance.
The temporal resolution of the eye was evaluated by determining the values of the slope of the exponential function, slope b, by least-squares fit, instead of using the critical flicker fusion frequency (CFFF).
To address this issue, electro-retinography was used to measure the changes in retinal light sensitivity, flicker fusion frequency, and spectral sensitivity in black rockfish (Sebastes melanops) subjected to rapid decompression (from 4 atmospheres absolute [ATA] to 1 ATA) and Pacific halibut (Hippoglossus stenolepis) exposed to 15 minutes of simulated sunlight.
In addition, what appears to a human as a fluidly moving image on a television screen may actually appear to flicker to a cat, because the flicker fusion rate (the frequency at which a rapidly flickering light appears to be constant) of its retina is higher than the rate at which the television screen is refreshed.
At a rate of 30 frames per second, a phenomenon called flicker fusion causes the sequence of images to appear continuous.
Thus, he concluded that physical factors can account for the major part of the senile variation in flicker fusion. But what accounts for the remaining 20%?
When measured by means of the flicker fusion frequency (FFF), this effect is present only when normal eye movements are permitted.