flight envelope

(redirected from flight envelopes)

flight envelope

[′flīt ‚en·və‚lōp]
(aerospace engineering)
The boundary depicting, for a specific aircraft, the limits of speed, altitude, and acceleration which that aircraft cannot safely exceed.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

flight envelope

flight envelopeclick for a larger image
The defined conditions of air speed, altitude, g loading, sideslip, etc. the aircraft is permitted to operate within. It is a graph in which curves of the speed are plotted against altitude or other variables. It indicates the limits within which the aircraft can be operated safely.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
Tejas got first IOC in 2011 when its limited capabilities were certified in limited flight envelopes. After the first IOC the IAF, not satisfied with its performance, put it under Mig- 21 ++ category.
High complexity flight envelopes such as fully autonomous flights were conducted in both day and night conditions demonstrating convoy shadowing capability, EO/IR sensor utilisation, precision landing as well as long range missions using tactical hand-over between ground control stations using Saab's flexible stationary and mobile ground control station.
Reportedly, high complexity flight envelopes, such as fully autonomous flights were conducted in both day and night conditions demonstrating convoy shadowing capability, EO/IR sensor utilisation, precision landing, as well as long range missions using Tactical Hand-Over between Ground Control Stations using Saab's flexible stationary and mobile ground control station.
Test data allowed both the day and night flight envelopes to be significantly increased, and the aircraft is now able to operate off LHDs with wind speeds of up to 45 knots off the bow.
"Now that we are beginning to understand these effects, can we manipulate or control them to our benefit," Gad-el-Hak asks, "to make aircraft that maneuver better or move faster?" The idea is to expand aircraft "flight envelopes," which set limits on their speed and acceleration and establish other contraints.