flight rules

flight rules

[′flīt ‚rülz]
(navigation)
Rules established by competent authority to govern flights; the type of flight involved determines whether instrument flight rules or visual flight rules apply.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
has announced the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued an Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) certificate for the Navy training helicopter Bell 407GXi, the company said.
The Knight-Wilcox VariEze experimental airplane left Waukegan National Airport, flying under visual flight rules, intending to land at the Aurora airport.
The display lets pilots seamlessly upload flight information via Wi-Fi and includes advanced technologies like Honeywell's SmartView synthetic vision system, 2-D and 3-D moving maps, visual flight rules sectional charts, and instrument flight rules high- and low-altitude charts.
"Initially, Jharsuguda Airport was meant for only Visual Flight Rules (VFR) operations.
Specialists of the Mil Moscow Helicopter Plant, a subsidiary of the Russian Helicopters holding (part of Rostec) finished a series of Mi-38 flights conducted under the instrument flight rules (IFR), as well as in conditions of extremely high temperature and high altitude.
NAN reports that an Instrument Rating, in Aviation Parlance, is a qualification that pilot must have in addition to a Private Pilot or Commercial Pilot License to fly under Instrument Flight Rules (IFR).
The Federal Aviation Administration says Tim McCormack was only certified to fly under regulations known as visual flight rules, which require generally good weather and clear conditions.
The current ATC system allows aircraft to fly under two sets of flight rules. Some flights operate under one set of rules, whereas others operate under the other set.
The flight lead elected to launch visual flight rules (VFR) and proceeded to a visual route (VR) for some section low-level work.
In Antarctica, Hawley and one other pilot will flight inspect navigational aids, so that other aircraft can fly under what is known as instrument flight rules conditions, or IFR, rather than visual flight rules, or VFR.
As many readers likely know from my earlier articles on gadgets in the cockpit (e.g., "Gadget Flight Rules," February 2013, and "Gadget Flight Rules 2.0, February 2015), I am an early adopter.

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