Flip-Flop Circuit

flip-flop circuit

[′flip‚fläp ‚sər·kət]
(electronics)

Flip-Flop Circuit

 

a term used in pulse engineering to denote a device possessing two or, less often, several steady states and capable of changing abruptly from one state to another. The abrupt change of state is an externally initiated response due to avalanche-type processes, which develop in the circuit as a consequence of the strong positive feedback. The external pulse is a trigger, or tripping pulse; the change of state occurs whenever this pulse reaches a level called the trigger level. The active elements in a flip-flop circuit include electron and discharge tubes, transistors, and tunnel diodes. The circuit for the aperiodic electron-tube amplifier with a positive feedback loop that was designed by M. D. Bonch-Bruevich in 1918 is a classic example of an electronic flip-flop circuit. The most commonly employed flipflop circuit in automated equipment and computer technology is the trigger circuit.

References in periodicals archive ?
The EPROM chip facilitates safety backup and the unrestricted capacity to retrieve, copy and store all programmed information to a flip-flop circuit called SRAM.
A static RAM bit is made up of a flip-flop circuit that lets current flow through one side or the other based on which one of two transistors is activated.
To split the incoming LO signal into two signals that are I/Q, the model RF9958 utilizes a divide-by-two flip-flop circuit.
a) Pointer-controlled pipeline technique In conventional pipelining, flip-flop circuits connecting the pipeline stages operate once per cycle, and several times before one instruction is completed, to update data.
Inphi's comprehensive family of D flip-flop circuits enable more efficient transponder designs that run extremely fast but burn very little power," said Gary Franzosa, director of marketing at Inphi.