float

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float

1. Angling an indicator attached to a baited line that sits on the water and moves when a fish bites
2. Chiefly US any buoyant object, such as a platform or inflated tube, used offshore by swimmers or, when moored alongside a pier, as a dock by vessels
3. a blade of a paddle wheel
4. Brit a buoyant garment or device to aid a person in staying afloat
5. a hollow watertight structure fitted to the underside of an aircraft to allow it to land on water
6. another name for air bladder
7. a motor vehicle used to carry a tableau or exhibit in a parade, esp a civic parade
8. a small delivery vehicle, esp one powered by batteries
9. Austral and NZ a vehicle for transporting horses
10. a sum of money used by shopkeepers to provide change at the start of the day's business, this sum being subtracted from the total at the end of the day when calculating the day's takings
11. Engineering a hollow cylindrical structure in a carburettor that actuates the fuel valve
12. (in textiles) a single thread brought to or above the surface of a woven fabric, esp to form a pattern
13. Forestry a measure of timber equal to eighteen loads
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Float

 

a device that has both floatability and buoyancy when immersed.

Floats may be of the support type (pontoons of seaplanes and floating bridges, the floats of fishing nets, and hook floats of fishing rods); the hydrometric type, for measurement of flow velocity or variations in level (such as tide gauges); or the actuating type, which operate shutoff valves and other devices depending on the level of a liquid (as in the float chamber of a carburetor and in water-supply systems and the like).

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

float

[flōt]
(agriculture)
A device consisting of one or more blades used to level a seedbed.
(biology)
An air-filled sac in many pelagic flora and fauna that serves to buoy up the body of the organism.
(design engineering)
A file which has a single set of parallel teeth.
(engineering)
A flat, rectangular piece of wood with a handle, used to apply and smooth coats of plaster.
A mechanical device to finish the surface of freshly placed concrete paving.
A marble-polishing block.
Any structure that provides positive buoyancy such as a hollow, watertight unit that floats or rests on the surface of a fluid.
(geology)
An isolated, displaced rock or ore fragment.
(industrial engineering)
(textiles)
A thread used to create patterns in fabric by passing over other threads.
A fabric defect caused by passing a thread over other threads where it should be interwoven.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

float

A flat tool with a handle on the back; used on cement or plaster surfaces for smoothing or for producing textured surfaces. Also see angle float, bull float, carpet float, rotary float.

render, float, and set

Three-coat plastering executed directly on stone or brick.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

float

i. The horizontal distance traveled by an aircraft from the moment of a flare for landing to the actual touchdown.
ii. A buoyant structure or component fitted to an aircraft to enable it to be supported in water or to stabilize it in water. See float gear.
iii. A buoyant needle or capsule in a float-type carburetor that keeps the fuel level a constant distance below the edge of the discharge nozzle. See float-type carburetor.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

float

In programming, a declaration of a floating point number.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ma, "Changing patterns of the floating population in China during 2000-2010," Population and Development Review, vol.
The working and living space of the "floating population" in China.
The boom had burst and Winnipeg people settled down to business, while the floating population slowly disappeared.
According to Article 2 of the Interim Measures on Schooling for Children Among the Floating Population (Chinese National Education Committee, 1998), migratory children are defined as follows: children between the ages of 6 and 14 living with parents or guardians in a temporary location for more than half a year, who have the ability to study.
Therefore, members of the floating population filled a niche that proved to be quite lucrative.
Changes in the rural and urban labor markets led to the emergence of a floating population of rural Chinese who poured into the cities to look for work in the 1980s and 1990s.
The household income gap between urban and rural is at least three to one, which has produced a "floating population" of unemployed rural labor numbering about 100 million seeking work in the cities.
One group not interviewed was the "floating population," unemployed persons coming to the cities seeking work.
This group of people is called the 'floating population' in China, to distinguish them from those whose household registration is changed or who remain in the city for many years.
the central quarters were left, not just to the poor, but increasingly to a highly mobile, floating population. Nowhere was this more marked than in the quarter of the Greve and in those adjoining it.
Although changes in the political realm are somewhat limited, the authors contributing to the section on "Fragmenting Society" see significant change among such social groups as workers, farmers, the "floating population" the new middle class, and politically independent intellectuals.
By examining this "floating population," a category that straddles the historical segmentation between urban and rural, Solinger is able to illuminate the nuances, ambiguities, and complexities of China's economic reforms.

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