floe

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Related to floes: ice floes

floe

[flō]
(oceanography)
A piece of floating sea ice other than fast ice or glacier ice; may consist of a single fragment or of many consolidated fragments, but is larger than an ice cake and smaller than an ice field. Also known as ice floe.
References in periodicals archive ?
A harp seal looks at the remains of other seals during the first day of the annual harp seal hunt on a ice floe in the Gulf of St Lawrence, Prince Edward Island, Canada; A harp seal is clubbed to death
Large flocks of common eiders Somateria mollissima (200-12 500 birds) were seen along floe edges, and small groups occurred in some polynyas.
Dick's dad was one of the 22 men left on the island after Shackleton and five others set off in one of the Endurance lifeboats when the ice floes broke up.
With the haunting cries of the harp seal pups playing in the ice behind them the only other sound, Sir Paul said: "We are out here on the ice floe trying to call upon the Canadian people, the Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper and his government to consider putting an end once and for all to the seal culls.
PAUL McCartney has pledged to venture out on to Canadian ice floes later this week to stop an annual seal cull.
Most of their 200-mile expedition will be made by dinghy but Susie will have to lug a six-stone backpack across the ice floes.
The monstrous floes of ice menaced Worsley, who, in the insidious grip of his dream, saw himself at the wheel of a great ship, desperately trying to navigate the dangerous waters that filled the street.
Despite its tough 48mm-thick armored steel hull that can burst through ice floes, the Yamal offers onboard amenities such as a theater-style auditorium, a gym and a heated indoor swimming pool.
Project planners had expected to park the icebreaker amid floes measuring 3 m thick, the kind of ice seen in the 1970s during the last major U.
As October approaches, ice floes, freezing temperatures and permanent darkness converge.
Eccentric color floes "complement" the line in intricate ways.
The last time this occurred was in 1963, which saw heavy ice floes in the Mersey and if this happens this winter, we could see a hard freeze of the river.