flood current

flood current

[′fləd ‚kə·rənt]
(oceanography)
The tidal current associated with the increase in the height of a tide.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Shames had been hunting ducks at the lake when he was pulled by the flood current, a source told The Daily Star.
Citing a graphical procedure presented by prominent Flood geologist Steve Austin in Grand Canyon: Monument to Catastrophe for estimating Flood current velocities said to be necessary to deposit cross-bedded sandstones, (3) Greg Neyman qualitatively explained how sediment transport in a year-long Flood would be insufficient to form a single, conspicuous sedimentary formation in Grand Canyon known as the Coconino Sandstone.
Strong flood currents at the height of Tropical Storm 'Urduja' (international name: Kai-tak) severed parts of a 400-millimeter pipe in the village of Sambiray in Malay town, Aklan.
"The floods mean no work and no money for me," the 51-year-old told AFP, trying to keep his balance as he walked through strong flood currents in Candaba.
Bedload transport of sand along the estuary is generally controlled by the local dominance of ebb or flood currents (Dronkers, 1986).
The flood currents are normally higher than the ebb ones, so the most efficient hydrodynamic track is located near the western bank according with the situation more favourable for the ebbing flows.
On the flood currents, an inmate would be dragged seven miles toward Berkeley across the bay--too long in the 50 degree water.
An elderly woman clung to a tree, holding on to the trousers of her World War II veteran husband so the flood currents did not carry him off.
Maximum flood currents are observed near high water elevations, and maximum ebb currents, near low water.
T-shaped docks projecting out into the creek were rejected because of strong tidal ebb and flood currents. The proposed docks are cantilevered out from the shore and kept low to high water so that at low water they are still within 30 inches of the surface (about 18 inches' difference exists between high and low tides).
The boring enables Transco to keep its pipe from becoming exposed as a result of the erosion caused by the swift flood currents.