flood tide

(redirected from floodtide)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

flood tide

[′fləd ‚tīd]
(oceanography)
That period of tide between low water and the next high water.
A tide at its highest point.
References in periodicals archive ?
O Cadhain's Gaeltacht characters often suffer dislocation: whether as a result of emigration, in the story "An Taoille Tuile" ("Floodtide") or due to the strictures of arranged marriage in "An Bhearna Mhil" ("Harelip) (An Braon Broghach).
(13.) SENATOR AL GORE, EARTH IN THE BALANCE: ECOLOGY AND THE HUMAN SPIRIT 145 (1992) ("[T]he floodtide of garbage [is] spilling out of our cities and factories"; we are "running out of ways to dispose of our waste in a manner that keeps it out of either sight or mind."), cited at p.
The official claim is that if `we' do not discourage refugees Australia will experience `a floodtide' or `waves' of displaced people; we will be `swamped by foreigners'.
Meanwhile, Time Warner has now merged with AOL--so as to own the cyberworks through which to market its floodtide of movies, ball games, TV shows, rock videos, cartoons, standup routines and (not least) bits from CNN, CNN Headline News, CNNfn (devised to counter GE's CNBC) and CNN/Sports Illustrated (a would-be rival to Disney's ESPN franchise).
Fortunately, this 7th Circuit opinion has not made a dent in the floodtide of consumer-based lawsuits in felony states.
I would inevitably ask myself what it was that had happened in the tumultuous period some of us remember as "the Baltimore AMS (in 1988)," some of us as "Minneapolis, 1991," but almost all of us remember as a profound institutional change that unleashed a floodtide of published music scholarship on women, gender, and sexuality in the 1990s.
Kritzer, Holding Back the Floodtide: The Role of Contingent Fee Lawyers, WIS.
And unlike such cities as Miami and Los Angeles, it has not recently attracted a floodtide of newer immigrants from Latin America and Asia.
It is important to note that when Wilhelm Ropke died on February 12, 1966, in his sixty-seventh year, at his home in Geneva, in the floodtide of his powers, full of honors, and with a veritable mountain of achievement behind him--his bibliography then comprised almost 900 works, including some thirty books--this calamitous event was noted on the front pages of virtually every major newspaper in Western Europe.
Tideland--(1) The area adjacent to the sea or ocean which is covered during floodtide. (2) The shallow sea bottom (in some instances several miles from shore).
Carried along on a floodtide of great popular songs, most musicals, including Hollywood "talkies," remained insouciantly episodic until the development of the "book musical" in the 1940s.
September brightness sharpens everything even when the windshield isn't clear, and the backlot ragweed is conspiring to flaunt the leveled floodtide of the year before it hunkers down and loses scope the way an old man has to.