Florid

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Florid

Highly ornate; extremely rich to the point of being overly decorated.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

florid

Highly ornate; extremely rich to the point of overdecoration.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
If we see this language as one in which the flower itself speaks, we can develop a better understanding of a language that is itself like flowers and evokes the "gendered and aesthetic dimensions of floridity" (38).
The war may have helped to eliminate the limpid floridity characteristic of Sassoon's immature pre-war poetry, but it did not alter the "romantic" approach that characterized much of his war writing and informs his memoirs.
After World War I, he wrote that authors should tell the truth in a simple and realistic way that emphasized substance over style rather than style over substance that was a leftover from the fin de siecle floridity exemplified in Oscar Wilde.
hard for their best friends." (96) Ugly portents of ruin, recalling the totemic 1930s' depression, were stock-in-trade for the bill's opponents in early 1964, but Hirst's speech was notable not only for its floridity. It suggested that some backbenchers were prepared to acknowledge the almost poujadiste image, as peddled by the RPMCC, of the small, Tory-voting trader besieged by big business and the state as legitimate and to defend him accordingly.
And, curiously enough, in the mid-Renaissance, rhetoric and floridity were drawn out of the very Greek and Latin revival that had freed the world from mediaevalism and Aquinas.
As a writer, I like words and their amazing capacity for clarity and precision as well as floridity and figurativeness.
"Suor Angelica" was scrubbed free of some of its spiritual floridity thanks to the canny decision to set all three operas in the 1950s.