floss

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floss

1. the mass of fine silky fibres obtained from cotton and similar plants
2. any similar fine silky material, such as the hairlike styles and stigmas of maize or the fibres prepared from silkworm cocoons
3. See dental floss

floss

[fläs]
(metallurgy)
Molten or solid slag floating on the surface of a metal melt.

FLOSS

(Free, Libre and Open Source Software) See free software and open source.
References in periodicals archive ?
Clearly, flossing is essential for overall body health.
There is some debate about how effective flossing really is "Recent reviews of the evidence for the long-term effectiveness of dental floss have shown it is not as effective as interdental brushes for the removal of plaque and reduction in inflammation.
Needless to say, I was taken aback, though this was years before this week's news that the United States government has removed daily flossing from its official Dietary Guidelines for Americans after admitting to the Associated Press that "the effectiveness of flossing had never been researched".
Parents should supervise flossing until the child is about 10 years old, or later if the child requires additional supervision.
7) In many developing countries like India, however, flossing is not practised regularly.
This review is to determine the effectiveness of flossing in addition to toothbrushing for preventing gum disease and dental caries in adults.
Various studies have shown that, aside from tooth loss, gum disease is a big risk factor for Alzheimer's and memory issues, and that regular flossing can lower your risk of heart disease, arterial issues, and diabetes.
Some may have to work harder than others at brushing and flossing.
By brushing and flossing according to the techniques certified by the American Dental Association (ADA), teeth and gums will be free from plaque and bacteria which cause tooth decay, gingivitis, and other periodontal diseases.
OBJECTIVES: Regular (daily) dental flossing is recommended for preventing oral diseases, but adherence is unsatisfactory.
Brushing and flossing your teeth can protect you from decay, but once a cavity happens, a dentist has to fix it.
Conducted in the run-up to National Smile Month, which runs until the end of June, the nationwide survey saw one in two people admit to brushing for less than two minutes, 40% to never flossing and a staggering half saying they never cleaned their tongue.