fluctuation theory

fluctuation theory

[‚flək·chə′wā·shən ‚thē·ə·rē]
(optics)
The theory proposed by M. von Smoluchowski and A. Einstein which states that the scattering of light occurs in pure water because random molecular motion causes density variations which effect changes in the refraction of light.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chapter III of Part II reviews the role of the wage and money system in this presentation of business fluctuation theory. Its five sub-sections in turn deal with 'the wage system and the volume of production'; 'money in the boom'; 'money in crisis and depression'; the role of gold; and finally a section on 'under-consumption', largely a criticism of J.A.
He said that this unexpected discovery brings together both orbital fluctuation theory and the 50-year-old 'excitonic' theory for high-temperature superconductivity, opening a new frontier for condensed matter physics.
The limitation of the weak fluctuation theory was clearly demonstrated, and saturation phenomenon of the scintillation was discovered by the experimental data of Gracheva and Gurvich [11] in 1965.