flügelhorn

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flügelhorn

(flü`gəlhôrn'), three-valved brass instrument similar in size and shape to the trumpettrumpet,
brass wind musical instrument of part cylindrical, part conical bore, in the shape of a flattened loop and having three piston valves to regulate the pitch. Its origin is ancient; records of a type of simple valveless trumpet are found in China from as early as 2000 B.C.
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 but having a conical rather than a cylindrical bore and possessing a larger bell. Because of these differences the tone of the flügelhorn is mellower than that of the trumpet. It is used traditionally in concert bands and has recently been used in jazz ensembles.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Flügelhorn

 

a wind instrument with a mouthpiece. The term “flügelhorn” was originally applied to various instruments in the bugle family but later came to refer only to the soprano bugle. The flügelhorn is distinguished from other instruments in the family by its wider bore; it may also be made with a narrower bore, closer in diameter to that of a cornet. The range and notation are the same as those of a soprano cornet; the key is B flat or, less frequently, C. The flügelhorn appeared circa 1825 in Austria.

REFERENCES

Chulaki, M. Instrumenty simfonicheskogo orkestra, 3rd ed. Moscow, 1972.
Sachs, C. Reallexikon der Musikinstrumente. Berlin, 1913; facsimile ed., Hildesheim, 1964.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
John Parricelli's Indigo opens with his electric guitar harmonics on a loop, his guitar synth shimmering beneath, and Sulzmann's soprano and Wheeler's fluegelhorn singing over the top.
The band - which features Brooks Barnett on trumpet and fluegelhorn, Joe Manis on tenor sax and bass clarinet, Michael Waissman on acoustic bass, Jordan Glenn on drums and Dustin Lanker on keyboards - describes its shiny sound as "lounge-core-avant-funk."
The opening title track brings the warm intimacy and fast vibrato of this veteran singer compellingly to the fore, his own quiet piano and the fluegelhorn of John Sneider punctuating the verses.