fluent aphasia


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Related to fluent aphasia: Wernicke's aphasia, Progressive aphasia

fluent aphasia

[¦flü·ənt ə′fā·zhə]
(psychology)
Aphasia in which the facility of articulation, grammatical organization, and rate of speech are well preserved, while the comprehension of language and word choice are most affected; typically caused by lesions posterior to the rolandic fissure.
References in periodicals archive ?
As the author is very careful to define even basic concepts in aphasia, the monograph could be used as a textbook, providing students or medical staff with a general introduction to fluent aphasia, its assessment, and issues pertaining to its underlying causes.
In describing the performance of persons with fluent aphasia, Edwards focuses primarily on issues in lexical access and possible grammatical deficits.
Holland (1980, 1982) reported that adults with non-fluent aphasia demonstrated a more 'normal' pattern of communication than adults with fluent aphasia. Busch, Brookshire, and Nicholas (1988) also found adults with non-fluent aphasia to be more efficient in communicating crucial information than adults with fluent aphasia.
On the other hand, the lesion in the temporoparietal junction may be responsible for fluent aphasia with no effect upon language and executive control.
One example of this is to incorporate appropriate and certified animals into speech-language therapy sessions for people with traumatic brain injury or fluent aphasia following stroke.
Comprehension of indirect requests by persons with fluent aphasia. Perceptual and Motor Skills, 96, 245-256.
A second individual with fluent aphasia improved little in picture-naming and sentence-generation tasks for both nouns and verbs.
Fluent aphasias cause a problem with comprehension but don't deprive the sufferer of the ability to speak, while the non-fluent aphasias cause slow, stilted speech in spite of various levels of understanding.