flufenamic acid


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flufenamic acid

[¦flü·fə¦nam·ik ′as·əd]
(pharmacology)
C14H10F3NO2 Pale yellow needles with a melting point of 125°C; used as an anti-inflammatory drug or analgesic.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, some NSAIDs, such as flufenamic acid, may regulate various channel activities and exhibit agonistic activity on TRPA1s via allosteric binding in addition to covalent modification of channel proteins (42).
Although some studies have not reported differences in effectiveness, others have stated that fenamates (mefenamic acid, tolfenamic acid, flufenamic acid, meclofenamate, bromfenac) may have slightly better efficacy than phenylproprionic acid derivatives (ibuprofen, naproxen).
Alwarthan, "Determination of flufenamic acid and mefenamic acid in pharmaceutical preparations and biological fluids using flow injection analysis with tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II) chemiluminescence detection," Analytica Chimica Acta, vol.
Non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin, ibuprofen, flufenamic acid, indomethacin, and phenylbutazone, are extensively used to treat most of the inflammatory disorders [38-40], however, long term usage leads to various side effects such as nephrotoxicity, gastric ulceration, and bleeding.
'The study could pave the way for medical institutions to use flufenamic acid which has unexpectedly been proven to be effective at fighting cancers,' said Shinya Tanaka from Hokkaido University in Japan.
For instance, propyl starch nanoparticles loaded with different types of drug (flufenamic acid, testosterone, and caffeine) showed enhanced effectiveness upon permeation studies on human skin [15].
Mefenamic acid, Flufenamic Acid and Glafenine is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent with analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antipyretic properties.