fluid coupling


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fluid coupling

[¦flü·əd ¦kəp·liŋ]
(mechanical engineering)
A device for transmitting rotation between shafts by means of the acceleration and deceleration of a fluid such as oil. Also known as hydraulic coupling.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Fluid coupling

A device for transmitting rotation between shafts by means of the acceleration and deceleration of a hydraulic fluid. Structurally, a fluid coupling consists of an impeller on the input or driving shaft and a runner on the output or driven shaft. The two contain the fluid (see illustration). Impeller and runner are bladed rotors, the impeller acting as a pump and the runner reacting as a turbine. Basically, the impeller accelerates the fluid from near its axis, at which the tangential component of absolute velocity is low, to near its periphery, at which the tangential component of absolute velocity is high. This increase in velocity represents an increase in kinetic energy. The fluid mass emerges at high velocity from the impeller, impinges on the runner blades, gives up its energy, and leaves the runner at low velocity. See Hydraulics

Basic fluid couplingenlarge picture
Basic fluid coupling
McGraw-Hill Concise Encyclopedia of Engineering. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.