Fluorosis


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Related to Fluorosis: Skeletal fluorosis

Fluorosis

 

a chronic disease caused by prolonged excessive ingestion of fluorine. The consumption of water with a high fluorine concentration (more than 1–1.2 mg/liter) or food with an excessive quantity of fluoride compounds results in the retention of fluorine salts in bones and dental tissues and the replacement of soluble calcium compounds by the insoluble compounds of calcium and fluorine. Fluorosis is manifested by the appearance of stains on dental enamel and by a change in the structure of bony tissue (osteosclerosis), causing bone deformity and calcification of ligaments. When contact with fluorine is terminated, symptoms of fluorosis decrease.

References in periodicals archive ?
Twenty-eight provinces were affected by fluorosis in China [in Chinese].
Fluorosis has some hormonal, gastrointestinal, hematological, skeletal, renal, respiratory, cardiovascular, immunological, neurological and developmental side effects (1-4).
While dental fluorosis is very common, we are more concerned about skeletal fluorosis as it can lead to structural deformities," Bhagotia adds.
Mild dental fluorosis, or mottling of the teeth, has increased in fluoridated communities from 13.
In chronic fluoride toxicity, the major manifestation of chronic ingestion of excess amounts of fluoride can result in significant enamel defects known as dental fluorosis.
Endemic skeletal fluorosis in children: hypocalcemia and the presence of renal resistance to parathyroid hormone.
The Irish Expert Body on Fluorides and Health asked for the reduction because of a slight increase in dental fluorosis.
Parents may not know that giving fluoridated water to infants younger than 1 has the potential to cause enamel fluorosis in the child's permanent teeth still in development in the gums.
This text was drafted in response and contains chapters discussing fluoride environmental occurrence, geochemistry, and exposure; human health effects; guidelines and standards; removal of excessive fluoride; analytical methods; and country data on dental and skeletal fluorosis associated with exposure to fluoride through drinking water (covering 28 countries).
Dental fluorosis is not the only risk stemming from a baby's exposure to fluoride.
The study found no significant difference between the two cities for children's decayed, missing and filled teeth, but discovered twice the rate of dental fluorosis in children in the fluoridated city.