fluxoid

fluxoid

[′fluk‚sȯid]
(solid-state physics)
One of the microscopic filaments of magnetic flux that penetrates a type II superconductor in the mixed state, consisting of a normal core in which the magnetic field is large, surrounded by a superconducting region in which flows a vortex of persistent supercurrent which maintains the field in the core. Also known as flux line; fluxon; vortex.
References in periodicals archive ?
Waszczak, "Scanning-Tunneling-Microscope Observation of the Abrikosov Flux Lattice and the Density of States near and inside a Fluxoid," Physical Review Letters, vol.
The new optics are enabling microstructural studies that link nanoscale with micrometer-scale features in, for example, polymer-clay nanocomposites, gels, and fluxoid lattices in superconductors.
On the origin of the irreversibility line in superconductors Depinning or melting of fluxoids. Physica C 214, 100.
Intermittency can be further studied in the framework of Ginzburg-Landau (GL) model as used to describe the confinement of magnetic fields into fluxoids in type II superconductor, according to which, the ratio [d.sub.q]/[d.sub.2] should respect the relation
Such an approach also reflected Higgins's overriding emphasis on freedom: He and his fellow Fluxoids pursued liberating impulses into realms bordering on anarchy, in an often irreverent effort to collapse the distinctions between art, life, and play.
This penetrating field exists within the material in the form of separate magnetic filaments, or lines of flux, called fluxoids. The fluxoids generally settle into a regular pattern, or lattice, often pinned in place by impurities or microscopic defects in the material.