flycatcher


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flycatcher,

common name for various members of the Old World family Muscicapidae, insectivorous songbirds including the kingbirds, phoebes, and pewees. Flycatchers vary in color from drab to brilliant, as in the crested monarch and paradise flycatchers of Asia and Africa. The New World family Tyrannidae (tyrant flycatchers), includes 365 species distributed over the Americas from the Canadian tree limit to Patagonia. Most are arboreal and inconspicuously colored in olive-green, brown, or gray, the species grading into one another almost imperceptibly. They range in length from 3 1-2 in. to 16 in. (8.7–40 cm), the majority being under 10 in. (25 cm). Flycatchers have large heads, broad shoulders, flattish bills, pointed wings, and small, weak legs and feet. The tails are rounded or shallowly forked, except for that of the scissor-tailed flycatcher of the SW United States, a gray bird with black wings and tail and reddish patches at the wing base, whose long (7–10 in./17.5–25 cm), deeply forked tail enables it to perform aerial acrobatics. Flycatchers characteristically feed by darting after insects from an advantageous perch; the name tyrant reflects their pugnacity toward crows, hawks, and other large birds, which they harass with great determination. Their crown feathers are more or less erectile; in the royal flycatcher of Mexico and Brazil, Pyrocephalus rubineus Mexicanus, also called vermilion flycatcher, they are developed into a flaming crest. Many flycatchers are found near water, e.g., the eastern phoebe, or water pewee (Sayiornis fusca), a gray bird named for its plaintive, repetitive call and identifiable by its habit of flicking or bobbing its tail while perched. The wood pewee, genus Contopus, is a shy forest bird. The Say's, black, and San Jose phoebes are Western species. The 9-in. (22.5 cm) eastern kingbird is typical of the kingbird group; it has a dark back, white breast, and white-tipped tail. Kingbirds are also called bee martins, though they actually prefer other insects. The small (under 6 in./15 cm) empidonax flycatchers are all olive-green and are difficult to distinguish; they include the least, Acadian, and alder (or Traill's) flycatchers of the East and the western, Hammond's, Wright's, and vermilion flycatchers of the West. The South American kiskadee dives for fish like a kingfisher. The nesting habits of flycatchers vary; the typical nest is an open cup in a tree, but some nest on buildings and in concealed places, and the great crested flycatcher of E North America is a cavity-nester that habitually lines its nest with cast snake skins. Certain fly-catching warblers, belonging to a different family, are sometimes called flycatchers. Flycatchers are classified in the phylum ChordataChordata
, phylum of animals having a notochord, or dorsal stiffening rod, as the chief internal skeletal support at some stage of their development. Most chordates are vertebrates (animals with backbones), but the phylum also includes some small marine invertebrate animals.
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, subphylum Vertebrata, class Aves, order Passeres, families Muscicapidae and Tyrannidae.

flycatcher

1. any small insectivorous songbird of the Old World subfamily Muscicapinae, having small slender bills fringed with bristles: family Muscicapidae
2. any American passerine bird of the family Tyrannidae
References in periodicals archive ?
Flycatchers rely on super-fast reactions to spot a passing insect, launching from the high branch of a tree, and grabbing it during a few seconds of aerial ballet.
"Habitat restoration, for example, may not be enough on its own; the impacts we observed on the flycatcher occurred even with adequate habitat.
While both birds are responding to this shift in seasonal patterns--greater tits by laying their eggs earlier during warmer winters or building their nests later during colder springs, and pied flycatchers by migrating to Europe earlier--the flycatcher's adaptation is not as good as that of the great tits.
By timing this just right, the flycatchers ensure there's enough food around when their hungry chicks hatch.
These include the Spotted Flycatcher, Rufous- tailed Scrub Robin, Red- backed Shrike, Red- tailed Shrike, European Nightjar and the Great White Throat." He added, " Several birds I saw are in the ' IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.' With this documentation, we will certainly understand them better and they are sure to be a part of our memories." Shashank Dalvi
VISITOR The Acadian flycatcher has never been seen in UK
Twitchers from as far afield as Lancashire descended on the headland but there are fears the weary flycatcher has died.
Southwestern willow flycatcher potential prey base and diet in native and exotic habitats.
Richard Fahey, trainer of Flycatcher She's got to step right up on what she's done and we're searching for a bit of black type.
Their songs uniquely identify them, and certain flycatchers can be conclusively identified only by sound.
Meadowlark 46 (n=13) 64 (n=11) Bobolink 25 (n=4) 75 (n=4) Song Sparrow 50 (n=2) 63 (n=8) Mallard -- -- Field Sparrow 33 (n=3) 60 (n=5) Common Yellowthroat -- -- American Woodcock 100 (n=2) -- Wild Turkey -- 0 (n=1) Henslow's Sparrow 100 (n=1) -- Shrub or Above Ground Nester Robin 67 (n=3) 67 (n=3) Red-wing BB 38 (n=16) 27 (n=22) Brown Thrasher 0 (n=1) 100 (n=1) Willow Flycatcher - 0 (n=2) Yellow Warbler - 0 (n=2) American Goldfinch 100 (n=1 -- Northern Mockingbird 100 (n=2) -- Mourning Dove -- 0 (n=1) Species 2010 2011 Average Ground or Near Ground Nester Grasshopper Sp.
Four of the bird species I detected, (Pileated Woodpecker, Olive-sided Flycatcher, Willow Flycatcher, and White-breasted Nuthatch) were listed as vulnerable by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (Table 1).