flying boat


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flying boat:

see seaplaneseaplane,
airplane designed to take off from and alight on water. The two most common types are the floatplane, whose fuselage is supported by struts attached to two or more pontoon floats, and the flying boat, whose boat-hull fuselage is constructed with the buoyancy and
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.

flying boat

[¦flī·iŋ ¦bōt]
(aerospace engineering)
A seaplane with a fuselage that acts as a hull and is the means of the plane's support on water.

flying boat

flying boat
A form of seaplane whose fuselage serves as the boat hull.

flying boat

a seaplane in which the fuselage consists of a hull that provides buoyancy in the water
References in periodicals archive ?
JAMIE DODSON, a career intelligence officer, is co-author, with former Pan Am stewardess Teresa Webber, of the new book Hunting the Wind: Pan American World Airways' Epic Flying Boat Era, 1929-1946 from Schiffer Publishing.
The Solent Sky Museum in Southampton evokes a golden age of air travel, when the flying boats of Imperial Airways took passengers to the far corners of the world.
The art and heritage project marks the forgotten history of RAF Wig Bay, which was a centre for UK and US flying boats - or "hunter killers" - that were deployed to counter German subs attacking Allied ships in the Atlantic.
The RAF accommodation has been knocked down and replaced by the Borras housing estate Catalina Flying Boat on the slipway at Llanfaes, near Beaumaris.
A flying boat will also be in action and a racing boat driven by a former F1 world champion will take visitors on high-speed thrill trips.
He also developed the flying boat, which early on allowed multi-engine designs to enter operations by World War I.
In May 1919, the Navy-Curtiss NC-4 completed the first flight across the Atlantic, demonstrating the long-range capabilities of the flying boat that was soon put on display with the fleet.
But, just a short journey away, we were to share a drink at the Foynes Flying Boat Museum that has made the country famous throughout the world.
Forty-five people who were killed when a flying boat crashed 50 years ago were remembered in a ceremony yesterday.
A sometimes nerve-tingling tale of the history and glory of the Dornier Wal (whale) amphibious aircraft, or flying boat as they were called, covering its roles in the North Pole (and many other) expeditions, passenger service, pioneering flights, world record achievements and World War II Dutch naval fleet surveillance duty.
The brief given to the Australians had been to find refuelling stops 300 miles apart, with an expanse of water that would allow a flying boat to take off and alight in any wind direction.