flying buttress


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flying buttress:

see buttressbuttress,
mass of masonry built against a wall to strengthen it. It is especially necessary when a vault or an arch places a heavy load or thrust on one part of a wall. In the case of a wall carrying the uniform load of a floor or roof, it is more economical to buttress it at
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.

flying buttress

A characteristic feature of Gothic construction in which the lateral thrusts of a roof or vault are carried by a segmental masonry arch, usually sloping, to a solid pier or support that is sufficiently massive to receive the thrust.
See also: Buttress

flying buttress

[¦flī·iŋ ′bə·trəs]
(architecture)
A buttress connected by an arch to the building it supports.

flying buttress

flying buttress: A
A characteristic feature of Gothic construction, in which the lateral thrusts of a roof or vault are taken up by a straight bar of masonry, usually sloping, carried on an arch, and a solid pier or buttress sufficient to receive the thrust.

flying buttress

a buttress supporting a wall or other structure by an arch or part of an arch that transmits the thrust outwards and downwards
References in periodicals archive ?
The church building was designed in the conventional Gothic style with the typical architectural features of pointed arches, ribbed vaults and flying buttresses; it had a pebble dash finish on its outer walls and cast concrete facades, while teak wood was used for the interior furnishings of the main sanctuary that can fit between 150 to 200 people.
However, one area where you CAN see this, is a cathedral (or any structure) employing Flying Buttresses.
Who, outside of Harley Earl (who was actually born in Hollywood, so unusual things were not so unusual to him), would have thought that such an exotic design with its flying buttresses and sharp shapes would be possible as a production car (although Earl retired from GM in 1958 and was to die in 1969)?
THE spires, flying buttresses, turrets and arched windows of Aberystwyth's Old College could have leapt straight from the pages of a Harry Potter novel.
Like every drop-top Ferrari, the 488's roof can only be operated when the car is stationary for safety reasons, but it can be electrically stowed under the new flying buttresses in 14 seconds.
Flying buttresses behind the seats send cooling air to the engine cover and intakes, with the rear spoiler (unchanged from the coupe) channeling air through a gap on the rear lip.
There is though, a nod to the old version with the fabric 'flying buttresses' - a nice touch.
Well, the long glass engine cover of pricier models is not seen here, replaced by a more upright concave rear screen flanked by a pair of flying buttresses said to increase downforce by 8kg on their own.
From the outside, its most distinctive feature is the series of massive flying buttresses that support its great height.
The McLaren design team has created a shape of beauty highlighted by details such as the rear flying buttresses that increase downforce as well as adding grace, and complex door tendons that direct additional air to cool the mid-mounted V8 engine
They jump on some storks that are at Tuileries Garden, and they fly-through the giant Ferris Wheel, over Seine River, through the flying buttresses at Notre Dame, and over a sidewalk cafe, until they finish by circling the model of the Statue of Liberty that sits in the middle of the Seine.
Built from 1160 in flamboyant Gothic style, they give you a close-up view of flying buttresses, spires and roofs.