flying fox


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flying fox:

see fruit batfruit bat,
fruit-eating bat found in tropical regions of the Old World. It is relatively large and differs from other bats in the possession of an independent, clawed second digit; it also depends on sight rather than echo-location in maintaining orientation.
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flying fox

1. any large fruit bat, esp any of the genus Pteropus of tropical Africa and Asia: family Pteropodidae
2. Austral and NZ a cable mechanism used for transportation across a river, gorge, etc.
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Friends of the Flying Foxes (FFF) said bats needed a 200-meter buffer zone from their roosting site so human activity and loud noises would not disturb their sleeping and mating patterns, according to a letter that the group sent to the Boracay Inter-Agency Task Force, Environment Secretary Roy Cimatu and the Malay municipal government in Aklan province.
"The demarcated critical habitat is mainly in Barangays Balabag and Yapak, where the flying foxes are concentrated," Atienza said.
The giant golden-crowned flying fox typically dwells deep in forest caves, however, which makes this sighting so spectacular.
On the ropes Kaiya takes off on the Flying Fox zipwire.
'Everything in the park is covered in flying fox faeces and you worry about getting urinated on,' Kim Gott, another resident, said.
Caption: Stefan Tcherepnin, Glam Flying Fox, 2017, faux fur, synthetic leather.
Microbial analysis shows that Indian flying fox ejecta are an amalgam of beneficial and pathogenic microbes and its pH (6.7 to 7.4), high concentration of phosphorus (4.50% and 4.33%) and nitrogen (3.26% and 2.37%) favor seed germination, enhance root growth and soil fertility.
With government approval, people for decades shot, poisoned, gassed, burnt, and electrocuted flying foxes. In the 1990s there were estimates of 100,000 or more grey-headed flying foxes being shot annually (Tidemann et al, "Grey-headed Flying Fox").
In the last Derby started by flag, French raider Holocauste broke a leg when going strongly two furlongs out and as a consequence George Lambton wrote of Flying Fox: "I shall always believe him to have been the luckiest horse in the world to have won the Derby."
* Combo - 2 (Bungy + Flying Fox) @ Rs 3500/- per person - $ 80 per person
There is no way of knowing the flying fox population figures prior to British settlement of Australia, but certainly the numbers would have been in the thousands of millions.