dressing

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Related to foam dressing: film dressing

dressing

1. a covering for a wound, sore, etc.
2. size used for stiffening textiles
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Dressing

Masonry and moldings of better quality than the facing materials, used around openings or at corners of buildings.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Dressing

 

a therapeutic and diagnostic procedure in the treatment of wounds that consists of removing old, contaminated dressings, examining and treating the wound and surrounding skin, and applying medication and a fresh bandage.

Aseptic and antiseptic methods must be strictly followed during the dressing procedure. The frequency of dressing and the type of medications used depend on the condition of the wound, which is dressed until completely healed.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

dressing

[′dres·iŋ]
(agriculture)
Manure or compost used as a fertilizer.
(civil engineering)
The process of smoothing or squaring lumber or stone for use in a building.
(engineering)
The sharpening, repairing, and replacing of parts, notably drilling bits and tool joints, to ready equipment for reuse.
(medicine)
Application of various materials for protecting a wound and encouraging healing.
Material so applied.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

dressing, dressings

1. Projecting ornamental moldings and carved decorations of all kinds.
2. Masonry or molding of better quality than the facing brick; used around openings or at corners of buildings; often made of gauged brick.
3. Smoothing a stone surface.
4. Bossing.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
KEY WORDS: Silver foam dressing, Second-degree burn, Wound infection, Ulcer.
Acelity said that the Tielle Foam Dressing Family was designed to meet the needs of healthcare professionals, including exudate management and reduced pain for the patient at dressing removal.
Does the use of an absorbent soft silicone self-adherent bordered foam dressing decrease the incidence of hospital acquired pressure ulcers?
Aquacel Foam dressing is specifically designed to meet wound management challenges.
Status of wound surface area every 4th day: In our present study mean reduction of size of ulcer in silver foam dressing and povidone iodine dressing in 1-50[cm.sup.2] on 8th day was 12.10% and 7.82% respectively(P=0.0243), on 12th day 25.76% and 17.68% respectively (P=0.0029), on 16th day 38.55% and 26.39% respectively (P=0.003), on 20th day 53.01% and 36.20% respectively (P<0.0001), on 24th day 65.0%, and 47.89% respectively (P<0.0001%) and on 28th day 76.45% and 57.29% respectively (P<0.0001).
The study's primary objective was to validate the essential performance characteristics of the new MediPlus(tm) Silicone Comfort Foam dressing that contribute to the dressing's ability to manage wound exudates and remain in place at the wound site (wear time), said MediPurpose Wound Care Marketing Manager Valerie C.
If the foam dressing is adherent, the area over the wound that comes in contact with wound drainage will not remain adherent.
To warm the wounds, a foam dressing was used that had a pocket into which a warming card could be inserted.
Advanced wound dressing include foam dressing, hydrocolloid dressing, alginate dressing, film dressing, hydrogel dressing, collagen dressing and others.
For example, the foam dressing "allowable utilization" is three dressings per week.
DermaLevin, from DermaRite Industries, is a sterile, waterproof foam dressing that maintains a moist wound environment and absorbs four times more excess exudates than hydrocolloids.