foie gras


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foie gras

(fwä grä) [Fr.,=fat liver], livers of artificially fattened geese. Ducks and chickens are also sometimes used in the making of foie gras. The birds, kept in close coops to prevent exercise, are systematically fed to the limit of their capacity. Under this treatment the livers are brought to weigh 2 or 3 lb (1.0–1.5 kg) or more. Foie gras was prized by epicures in Egypt, Greece, and Rome, but the fattening of geese for their livers became a lost art during the Middle Ages except in Strasbourg. The industry was revived in the 18th cent. following the creation of pâté de foie gras by Jean Joseph Close (or Clause), a chef brought to Alsace by a French governor of the province. The pâté is made by cooking fresh livers, reducing them to a paste delicately seasoned with wine and aromatics and combining it with truffles and finely chopped veal. The making of foie gras has become a famous industry of Strasbourg and of Toulouse, France. The product is exported to all parts of the world in several forms—the esteemed pâté; foie gras au naturel, the plain cooked livers; a sausage; and a purée.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The UK imported 100 tonnes of foie gras last year, mostly from France.
But I thought I would give some culinary background about Foie Gras.
In Contested Tastes , Michaela DeSoucey takes us to farms, restaurants, protests, and political hearings in both the US and France to reveal why people care so passionately about foie gras -- and why we should care too, according to a review on the Princeton University Press website.
She writes: "Foie gras is nothing more than a diseased liver produced in a real-life Hell's Kitchen.
At that time, Andrew Farquharson, the deputy master of the household at Clarence, told the publication, "The Prince of Wales has a policy that his chefs should not buy foie gras. His Royal Highness was not aware that the House of Cheese sells foie gras and this will be addressed when their warrant is reviewed."
"PETA has protested against this practice for years, showing videos of geese being force-fed that no one but the most callous chefs could stomach and revealing that foie gras is torture on toast and unimaginably cruel," Newkirk said.
Birds on foie gras farms are brutally fattened up using a feeding tube that is violently forced down their throats several times a day.
Marie-Pierre Pe from foie gras makers group CIFOG, said on Monday that prices could be 10 per cent higher this Christmas after the French government's decision last year to cull all ducks and geese, and halt output for four months, in a bid to contain the virus.
How can we forget Vongerichten's Hedgehog--the 1.5 ounce oval of cooked foie gras whose needles of toasted, sliced almonds and dots of truffle eyes charmed us so?
The law was actually passed way back in 2004, after being pushed by animal rights activists unhappy with the manner by which foie gras is produced.