folksonomy


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folksonomy

(FOLKS taxONOMY) Classifying websites by the user community rather than by taxonomy professionals. Folksonomy is said to provide a democractic tagging system that reflects the opinions of the general public. See social bookmarking site and taxonomy.
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This problem is solved by the differential approach in FolkRank, which computes a topic-specific ranking of the elements in a folksonomy. In our case, the topic is determined by the user/item pair (u, i) for which we intend to compute the tag recommendation.
This is something that all good taxonomists do, but which seems not to have occurred to too many folksonomy enthusiasts.
Elaine Peterson, author of the 2008 Library Philosophy and Practice article "Parallel Systems: The Coexistence of Subject Cataloging and Folksonomy," refers to this as the top-down approach to subject cataloging.
Folksonomy: a game of high-tech (and high-stakes) tag.
Subject cataloging has certain features that distinguish it from folksonomy. First, subject cataloging is a top-down approach, where the library professional determines the topical scope of the item being analyzed and assigns subjects to the bibliographic record.
The wealth of folksonomy data available from collaborative tagging sites like Flickr and Del.icio.us creates some tantalizing AI research opportunities.
The term folksonomy was coined in 2005 when information architect Thomas Vander Wal mashed up the words taxonomy and folk to name the growing phenomenon of users generating metadata by tagging pieces of digital information with their own searchable keywords.
A folksonomy is a user-generated taxonomy employed to categorize and retrieve web content such as Web pages, photographs and Web links using user-defined labels called tags (Jaschke et al., 2008; Tsui et al., 2010).
* When BioWizard imports citations from PubMed, it calls them "tags." This gives the incorrect impression that "tags" are defined by users as some sort of folksonomy.
Another way that Velocity fosters interactivity is by allowing users to add their own tags, to create a "folksonomy" that augments the formal taxonomy.
Flickr relies on tagging--an informal metadata scheme, often called a folksonomy, that allows users to make up their own classification terms instead of using those from a formal thesauri--to organize photos.
Users of del.icio.us work together to categorize the Web into a "folksonomy" (user-generated taxonomy).