folkways


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folkways

folkways, term coined by William Graham Sumner in his treatise Folkways (1906) to denote those group habits that are common to a society or culture and are usually called customs. The word provided a useful contribution to the development of the concept of culture and is still used in its technical sense in sociological literature. Fashions in clothing or modes of recreation exemplify folkways. The term has failed to maintain the currency it once enjoyed among the other social sciences but has gained acceptance as a colloquial term. See mores.
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folkways

the everyday customs of a social group or community (W. SUMNER, 1906). Folkways are contrasted with MORES, being less strongly sanctioned and less abstractly organized.
Collins Dictionary of Sociology, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2000
References in periodicals archive ?
She recorded numerous albums for Folkways, Elektra, and other labels.
Her work on television led to her introduction to a Folkways music director, who signed her to a recording contract in 1956, and the release of her first album the following year.
In "Christmas Eve," playwright Djanet Sears pays tribute to a Canadian yuletide season infused with West Indian folkways. "Jerk the chicken/ fry the fish/ season the curry goat," she writes.
In his lifetime, Moses Asch devoted himself to documenting what he called "people's music." Asch churned out dozens of releases each year on his label, Folkways Records, covering marginalized sounds from every corner of the globe.
"Classic Celtic Music from Smithsonian Folkways", compiled by music historian and folklorist Richard Carlin, is the 20th volume in the impressive 'Classic Series' from Smithsonain Folkways, a nonprofit record label of the Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.
His goal was to oversee production of a series of regional books with the general title of "American Folkways." Caldwell (quoted here from the 1996 University of Georgia Press reissue of Call It Experience) writes:
This work was originally written in Irish and is the first travel book of its kind comparing Irish folkways and Asian traditions.
King lamented the "Negro folkways" carried from large plantations and farms into the ghettos of America's cities, which resulted in "many unwanted children," But the blame for their sad existence fell squarely on the shoulders of powerful whites, who, by thwarting Sanger's efforts, withheld a "profoundly important ingredient in [the Negro mans] quest for security and a decent life."
As the nation celebrates the sesquicentennial of the Civil War, Smithsonian Folkways Recordings has released an enjoyable collection of Civil War songs performed by the late Tom Glazer.
Both populist and preservationist in spirit, the Yiddish 'language cinema of the early twentieth century memorialized the rapidly disappearing folkways and lifestyle of Jewish Eastern Europe and served as a driving force in the growth and dissemination of the transnational culture of the Diaspora.
Now, 38 years later, the Smithsonian's nonprofit Folkways label will release a revised collection Tuesday.
Songs of The Seminole Indians of Florida, produced by the Smithsonian Institution's Folkways Collection, is a beautiful compilation of traditional Seminole & Miccosukee