folly

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Related to follies: Ziegfeld Follies

folly

1. Architecture a building in the form of a castle, temple, etc., built to satisfy a fancy or conceit, often of an eccentric kind
2. Theatre an elaborately costumed revue

Folly

A functionally useless, whimsical or extravagant structure; often a fake ruin; sometimes built in a landscaped park to highlight a specific view, serve as a conversation piece, or to commemorate a person or event.

folly, eye-catcher

A functionally useless structure, often a fake ruin, sometimes built in a landscaped park to highlight a view.

Folly

Foolishness (See DIMWITTEDNESS, STUPIDITY.)
Fools (See CLOWNS.)
Abu Jahl
“father of folly”; opposes Mohammed. [Muslim Tradition: Koran 22:8]
Alnaschar’s daydream
spends profits before selling his goods. [Arab. Lit.: Arabian Nights, “The Barber’s Fifth Night”]
Bateau, Le
Matisse’s famous painting, displayed in the Museum of Modern Art for 47 days before someone discovered it was being shown upside down. [Am. Hist.: Wallechinsky, 472]
Bay of Pigs, the
disastrous U.S.-backed invasion of Cuba (1961). [Am. Hist.: Van Doren, 577]
Chamberlain, Arthur Nevil
British Prime Minister attempted to avert war by policy of appeasement. [Eur. Hist.: Collier’s, IV, 552]
columbine
traditional symbol of folly. [Plant Symbolism: Flora Symbolica, 173]
dog returning to his vomit
and so the fool to his foolishness. [O. T.: Proverbs 26:11 ]
Fulton’s Folly
the first profitable steamship, originally considered a failure. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 1025]
Gotham
English village proverbially noted for the folly (some-times wisely deliberate) of its residents. [Eng. Folklore: Brewer Dictionary, 410]
Grand, Joseph
spends years writing novel; only finishes first sentence. [Fr. Lit.: The Plague]
Hamburger Hill
bloody Viet Nam battle over strategically worthless objective (1969). [Am. Hist.: Van Doren, 631]
Howard Hotel
after completing construction, the contractors installed boilers and started fires before discovering they had forgotten to build a chimney. [Am. Hist.: Wallechinsky, 470]
Laputa and Lagada
lands where wise men conduct themselves inanely. [Br. Lit.: Gulliver’s Travels]
Seward’s Folly Alaska
once seemingly valueless territory which William Henry Seward bought for two cents an acre (1867), thirty years before the Klondike gold rush. [Am. Hist.: Payton, 610]
References in periodicals archive ?
They did this by building fanciful, escapist follies all around the countryside, many now crumbling--fake ruins falling to actual ruin--so that the Irish today are stuck figuring out what to do with them.
Travis joined the Follies at 14 and was immediately in the spotlight.
For most of us who saw the original production, Follies remains a water shed event, a kind of nonstop (there is no intermission) public immersion in what felt like a deeply private dream of wonder and terror.
Then, a 450-seat cabaret in a second rooftop theater was home to the raunchy Midnight Follies, but the architects estimate it would take another $25 million to acoustically separate the spaces and bring the other areas up to current code.
With our fate in such hands, the FDA follies of the 1980s may come to be regarded as the good old days.
Markowitz, the dapper 66-year-old impresario and cofounder of the Follies who introduces the show, calls this desert mecca for retirees "God's waiting room.
Allusions to Graham notwithstanding, the pavilion in Streamside Day Follies is composed of opaque planes--more like a tent or a house of cards than the perceptually undecidable structures Graham organizes through combinations of transparent and reflective surfaces.
In 1983, Bernard Tschumi invented a new iconic form with his fire-engine-red, shiny metallic follies scattered throughout the Parc de la Villette.
And he is rowing with considerable skill towards an impressive mock castle on an island that ranks as one of the country's most interesting modern follies.
Despite its flaws, a new recording of Stephen Sondheim's Follies is a must for fans
The Days We Danced is the story of this plucky family, written by Doris, who, at 14, became the youngest dancer in the Ziegfeld Follies.