food additive


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food additive

[′füd ‚ad·əd·iv]
(food engineering)
A substance added to foods during processing to improve color, texture, flavor, or keeping qualities; examples are antioxidants, emulsifiers, thickeners, preservatives, and colorants.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act long has directed FDA to review food additive petitions in 90 days, not two to five years, but the agency generally requires more time than 90 days.
E-numbers are assigned to each permitted food additive.
As is to be expected in a multi-author publication, there is some variation between chapters in emphasis of treatment of different aspects of food additive use.
Food Additives in the United States (#PF104) forecasts a dynamic, promising food additives industry through mid-decade with overall compounded growth of 3.5 percent by 1996.
The agency also is evaluating a food additive petition for olestra, which would partially replace the fat in oils and shortenings.
[USPRwire, Mon Jun 17 2019] Increasing awareness among consumers regarding the health benefits of using Potassium Polymetaphosphate food additives majorly in bakery & confectionary products is likely to infuse the growth of Potassium Polymetaphosphate Food Additives Market .
The Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA) has completed an in-depth review of the science related to the safety of carrageenan--a soluble fiber made from red seaweed and used as a stabilizer in food--finding it to be safe for use in infant formula, including formula for special medical purposes.
"Congress established our food additive regulatory program more than 50 years ago, and it does not stand up well to scrutiny based on today's standards of science and public transparency," said Tom Neltner, Food Additives Project director in the Pew Health Group.
"Anytime you introduce a purified material like that, it becomes a new food additive and needs federal regulatory approval," Johnson observes.
Consumers affect food additive markets because the types of food that shoppers purchase inform the types and quantities of food additives that are needed.
In 2005, the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) analysed information on the safety of using a new food additive, polyvinyl alcohol, as a laminating agent for food supplements.
"The yeast itself has been approved as a food additive [by the Food and Drug Administration]," says Kondo, "so it is considered to be a suitable host for production of proteins."

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