metatarsus

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Related to Foot bones: ankle bones

metatarsus

1. the skeleton of the human foot between the toes and the tarsus, consisting of five long bones
2. the corresponding skeletal part in other vertebrates

metatarsus

[‚med·ə′tär·səs]
(anatomy)
The part of a foot or hindfoot between the tarsus and the phalanges.
References in periodicals archive ?
His foot bones became markedly destroyed, to the extent that the ankle joint became flail and non-functional.
Other structural issues, like knock knees or the presence of extra foot bones such as an accessory navicular (associated with certain types of flat feet) or an os trigonum (located behind the ankle), may make pointework too difficult and painful.
Researchers also found that a control region of GDF6 that regulates activity in the wrist and foot bones and the tospeak gene overlap.
Data taken from the skull, hand, leg, and foot bones suggest that the man was between twenty-eight and thirty-two years old, was in good health, and stood five feet tall.
He also sold turtle parts, such as shells, legs and foot bones, which were made into buttons, dishes, necklaces, ornaments, etc.
The professor also explained how the cremated remains of the dead are carefully placed into urns to reflect the living body, thus the foot bones are placed in first and skull bones last.
The implants then were put into sheep with lesions in their foot bones. After 16 weeks, the scaffolds had remodeled into what appeared to be mature bone containing both cortical and medullary bone.
Round thick bones slide up, slippery knee-bones float between the long strips of cartilage, fine foot bones connect in an intricate puzzle long remembered.
"She has broken both foot bones. "Both her lower legs are broken and her knee caps have had to be reconstructed.
The unexpected prevalence of damage in the farmers' foot bones is more than just a historical curiosity; the researchers believe their findings provide new insights into how some micro-injuries happen.
"It's like excavating only human foot bones and concluding that people at that time had no hands."