footprint

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footprint

1. Computing the amount of resources such as disk space and memory, that an application requires
2. an identifying characteristic on land or water, such as the area in which an aircraft's sonic boom can be heard or the area covered by the down-blast of a hovercraft
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Footprint

The projected area of a building or piece of equipment on a horizontal surface.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

footprint

[′fu̇t‚print]
(building construction)
A description of the exact size, shape, and location of a building's foundation as the foundation has been installed on a specific site. Also known as building footprint.
(communications)
The area of the earth's surface that can be covered by a communications satellite at any given time.
(computer science)
The amount and shape of the area occupied by equipment, such as a terminal or microcomputer, on desktop, floor, or other surface area.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

footprint

The area on a plane directly beneath a structure (or piece of equipment), that has the same perimeter as the structure (or piece of equipment).
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

footprint

(jargon, hardware)
The floor or desk area taken up by a piece of hardware.

footprint

(jargon, storage)
The amount of disk or RAM taken up by a program or file.

footprint

(3)
(IBM) The audit trail left by a crashed program (often "footprints").

See also toeprint.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

footprint

The amount of geographic space covered by an object. A computer footprint is the desk or floor surface it occupies. A satellite's footprint is the earth area covered by its downlink. An application's footprint is the amount of memory (RAM) it requires. See form factor. See also memory footprint and digital footprint.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in periodicals archive ?
The National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, in its infant abduction prevention guidelines issued to medical facilities nationwide, advocates footprinting all newborns within 2 hours of birth, preferably before the infant is removed from the delivery room.
5 "Footprinting of Infants," FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin, October 1966, 8.
* Demonstrate the footprinting procedure, emphasizing the ball of the foot
Most models are built in simple programs such as Excel, but the increasing use of carbon footprinting has led to links into wider business systems such as ERP, and into product design systems such as CAD software, and now the first specialised systems for doing footprinting, including one the Carbon Trust is pioneering itself.
Because of this link with energy usage, there is a pretty common theme to all carbon footprinting exercises: that alongside the good works that they do for the planet, they also save money.
Carbon footprinting has taken off in a big way in recent years and the demand is only now starting to percolate down through the system.
Carbon footprinting has developed from the idea of life cycle analysis and from earlier attempts at setting up environmental standards, such as the ISO 14000 series and in particular the ISO 14040 life cycle analysis standard.
Using one of the examples in the Carbon Trust's Carbon Footprinting exhibition, you could get a Dyson claiming that its air hand-dryer was low carbon and a paper towels company claiming its products were exactly the same: but no way of comparing like with like.
The aim of PAS 2050 and the subsequent standards and revisions has been to enable companies to do carbon footprinting on any project or product, to set benchmarks, and to allow them to tailor the precision of the process to the outcome that they want from it.
Carbon footprinting, Nigel Graham believes, is not just about corporate social responsibility and good management practice.
It's the diversity that has led Whitbread to take the approach that it has towards carbon footprinting. One of the highlights of the Carbon Trust's exhibition was a very small bed sitting on top of a white plinth: the same bed now sits on top of Graham's desk.
Graham, though, believes the implications of carbon footprinting are much wider than just the bed.