Foppishness


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Related to Foppishness: fopperies, Campiness

Foppishness

Acres, Bob
affected, vain, cowardly, blustery country gentleman. [Br. Lit.: The Rivals]
Aguecheek, Sir Andrew
silly old fop, believes himself young. [Br. Lit.: Twelfth Night]
Blakeney, Percy
rescuer of French revolution victims disguises himself as brainless fop. [Br. Lit.: Scarlet Pimpernel]
Brummel, Beau
(George B. Brummel, 1778–1840) “prince of dandies.” [Br. Hist.: Century Cyclopedia, 682]
Flutter, Sir Fopling
witless dandy. [Br. Lit.: The Man of Mode]
Foppington, Lord
a selfish coxcomb, most intent upon dress and fashion. [Br. Hist.: Brewer Handbook, 381]
Kookie
teen idol of 1950s whose character was depicted by slick shirts, tight pants, and “wet look” hairstyle. [TV: “77 Sunset Strip” in Terrace, II, 282–283]
Malyneaux
epitome of the British dandy. [Am. Lit.: Monsieur Beaucaire, Magill I, 616–617]
Yankee Doodle Dandy
feather-capped dandy; “handy” with the girls. [Nurs. Rhyme: Opie, 439]
References in periodicals archive ?
What the reader is left with is the indelible impression of the many forms these degradations can take, the glacial process of change, and an air of governing foppishness and buffoonery that is downright embarassing and far more befitting a Restoration comedy than a 20th century institution such as the Times.
Smerdyakov The illegitimate son of Fyodor Pavlovich, who raped the boy's half - witted mother and later took the bastard into his house as a servant, Smerdyakov is a composite of cheap foppishness and second - rate intellect.
The late, great NME hack Steven Wells described Belle and Sebastian as "insipid bedwetters" and far worse but somehow I don't think such insults hold much sway; they revel in their affected, duffel-coated foppishness.
They love a decent goalkicker in these parts and the mercurial Gavin Henson, an intriguing embodiment of foppishness and virility, proved himself to be exactly that.
Sir Percy, played with wonderful foppishness by Richard E.
In several seasons with the Royal Shakespeare Company, he has moved from hilarious foppishness in The Man of Mode to the decadence of Thersites in Troilus and Cressida, while also playing a Konstantin riddled by melancholy in The Seagull, and the title roles in Marlowe's Edward II and Shakespeare's Richard III His Oswald is a man grasping for life at the point of death.