forage

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forage

[fär·ij]
(agriculture)
A vegetable food for domestic animals.
References in periodicals archive ?
Use your foraged ingredients to make jam, cordial, beer, wine and liqueurs, so get creative!
Wisconsin found that nearly one in three foraged for food at some point.
As water became more turbid, they ate a wider variety of prey and foraged in shallower water.
The mobile robot had foraged randomly until it found the power station and then memorized its location and in the next foraging trips the robot consumed less power.
And those ingredients don't come any more local or fresher than foraged foods.
They are most gregarious birds and often foraged on variety of food items that occur in shallow wetland habitat (Frederick, 2002).
Juveniles also foraged from taller trees and in areas with fewer trees and less grass, although these factors did not weight as strongly as height of perch.
(5) Foragers from control colonies (colony C with 15 subject bees and colony D with 10 subject bees) were challenged to forage through "the access holes" of the artificial flowers without models nor opportunity to watch other foragers on the artificial flowers nor opportunity to communicate with foragers that had successfully foraged at the artificial flowers.
Forget preconceptions about grubbing about in the mud, foraging for food has become an increasingly "ontrend" pastime, with the world's best restaurant - Noma in Copenhagen - specialising in foraged ingredients.
Encounter of protein, Ca and P was computed by multiplying area over which an individual rat foraged by density of each nutrient present in each habitat patch encountered.
The Arizona researchers allowed caged bumblebees that had never foraged among such flowers to watch for 10 minutes as trained workers from another colony visited either orange or green fake flowers.
During all seasons, red-cockaded woodpeckers foraged predominantly within the crown and high-trunk area of trees.