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ford,

shallow place in a body of water, especially a river, that may be crossed by wading. Around the crossings habitually forded, cities sprang up; hence fords came to be the sites of numerous river towns. They have been of particular importance in migrations and in the deployment of armies in campaigns and have therefore been frequently fortified.

ford

[fȯrd]
(hydrology)
A shallow and usually narrow part of a stream, estuary, or other body of water that may be crossed; for example, by wading or by a wheeled land vehicle.

Ford

assumes pseudonym to uncover adulterer. [Br. Lit.: Merry Wives of Windsor]

ford

a shallow area in a river that can be crossed by car, horseback, etc.

Ford

1. Ford Maddox original name Ford Madox Hueffer. 1873--1939, English novelist, editor, and critic; works include The Good Soldier (1915) and the war tetralogy Parade's End (1924--28).
2. Gerald R(udolph). born 1913, US politician; 38th president of the US (1974--77)
3. Harrison. born 1942, US film actor. His films include Star Wars (1977) and its sequels, Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981) and its sequels, Bladerunner (1982), Clear and Present Danger (1994), and What Lies Beneath (2000)
4. Henry. 1863--1947, US car manufacturer, who pioneered mass production
5. John. 1586--?1639, English dramatist; author of revenge tragedies such as 'Tis Pity She's a Whore (1633)
6. John, real name Sean O'Feeney. 1895--1973, US film director, esp of Westerns such as Stagecoach (1939) and She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949)
References in periodicals archive ?
Combative and headstrong, Ford started two automotive companies that failed before giving up on the production of cars for the popular market in order to build a single racecar.
But from the start, Ford was obsessed--to the point of antagonizing his partners and undermining his company's profits--with building a car that the emerging middle class could afford.
In an afterword to the 1886 edition of the novel, Ford noted that the work was semi-autobiographical and referenced her own personal and public struggle as she converted from Presbyterianism to the Baptist movement.
Ford would sell more copies of Grace Truman than any other of her works, but she kept writing.
This revolutionary increase was to come from profit-sharing of the next year's income, which Ford figured at a minimum of $10 million.
If Ford had nothing but contempt for Wall Street, the feeling was mutual.
Galpin sold 14,095 Ford cars and trucks, giving it nearly 4 percent of the state's market.
As soon as he had secured the Lovetts' services, Ford sought out players familiar with the violin and the sousaphone and such rare instruments as the cybalum and dulcimer to serve as a house orchestra.
If Trotman succeeds, Ford could be a big winner as the industry consolidates.
On the car side, that vision is found in renderings of the Ford Five Hundred, a "tall sedan" that shares its platform with the coming CrossTrainer crossover, which falls under the "mainstream transportation" column.
They paid dearly during the auto recession of the early 1980s, Ford worst of all.
StarBurst Multicast also gives Ford dealers a leg up on new auto standards.