forefoot


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Related to forefoot: forefoot valgus, forefoot varus

forefoot

1. either of the front feet of a quadruped
2. Nautical the forward end of the keel

forefoot

[′fȯr‚fu̇t]
(naval architecture)
The extreme forward end of the bottom of a ship.
(vertebrate zoology)
An anterior foot of a quadruped.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sprinters or runners with a forefoot strike may want to look at other options like the Epic React 2.
Forefoot pain tends to arise more frequently as people reach age 50.
The impact of high heels on the forefoot is compounded by the cramped toe box associated with high heels.
The results in Table 5 indicate that the regression coefficient for the plantar forefoot temperature (0.254) is positive indicating that the plantar forefoot temperature of neuropathic, neuroischaemic, or PAD patients is expected to be higher than that of healthy or DM healthy patients.
But ifthe patient has a compensated forefoot varus the medial mobilization/release would likely worsen their injury.
The zebris software allowed for immediate feedback on running biomechanics in three zones of the foot: rearfoot, midfoot and forefoot.
After the loading of 600N, the changes of the plantar pressure in forefoot were measured by the method of the F-scan plantar pressure system.
The following eight parameters were evaluated during static measurement: (1) forefoot peak pressure value (N/[cm.sup.2]), (2) rearfoot peak pressure value (N/[cm.sup.2]), (3) total plantar force (N), (4) forefoot plantar force percentage (%), (5) rearfoot plantar force percentage (%), (6) total contact area ([cm.sup.2]), (7) forefoot plantar contact area percentage (%), and (8) rearfoot plantar contact area percentage (%).
Generally, the forefoot load (FL) increases substantially from the beginning of the midstance to the end of the push-off.
The model allows to separate the forefoot and the hindfoot and to analyze the midtarsal joint biomechanics.
For Figures 15 and 16, big toe is represented by (T), medial forefoot (1), central forefoot (C), lateral forefoot (5), medial midfoot (MM), lateral midfoot (LM), and the heel by (H).
For stage IIB adult-acquired flatfoot deformity, the main pathological changes occur at the transverse tarsal joint with a characteristic of forefoot abduction and hindfoot valgus deformity.