foreign

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foreign

Law outside the jurisdiction of a particular state; alien
References in periodicals archive ?
By juxtaposing the sale of Rooksbill's house against the sale of a woman's body, Brome implicates Bedford's urban development in selling out the homeland to a suspect foreignness, focalizing a perceived clash between high Italian architecture and low Italian morals through a consideration of the feminine body.
By the time Queen Anne came to the throne these chairs were naturalised, gradually losing their obvious foreignness but their curvaceous outlines remained.
Instead, it was the early artists' iron determination, their foreignness and attractiveness, and the emotional appeal of the music they performed that proved eventually irresistible to North American audiences and created a bond be tween German and American audiences that would survive two world wars.
It notes that Kramsch's essay emphasizes the validation of diverse sociocultural perspectives offered by nonnative speakers, as well as aesthetic pleasures offered by linguistic foreignness, suggesting that the logical extension of this validation of nonnative perspectives, on the strictly linguistic level, challenges the field to reconsider notions of error and proponents of communicative approaches to language teaching.
Either way suggests a certain kind of foreignness that really suggests, to many Africans, whiteness.
Though immigrants are by definition foreign-born, their offspring, on the whole, tend to shed their foreignness in an accelerating process that is normally completed by the third generation.
In part, the combination of familiarity and foreignness.
Yet at the same time it has remained almost a closed book to us, seemingly embodying the very essence of difference and foreignness.
Blank argues that Spenser included elements of northern English dialect in order to enhance the sense of the foreignness of the text and to present himself as an outsider, a position that is then endowed with poetic power.
It stated that the checks could be made on the basis of "all elements that allow the presumption of foreignness, with the exception of racial appearance.
Our hypothesis that the foreignness of literary analysis would interfere with scientists' appreciation of the humanities turned out to be unfounded," Tobias and Abel conclude.