Colostrum

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colostrum

[kə′las·trəm]
(physiology)
The first milk secreted by the mammary gland during the first days following parturition.

Colostrum

 

in mammals and man, a secretion of the mam-mary glands present for a few days before and after parturition.

Colostrum is a thick, viscous, yellowish fluid with a brackish taste and characteristic odor. It differs from milk in its greater acidity, its higher content of dry matter (especially proteins— mainly albumins and globulins—and fats, minerals, and vitamins), and its lower content of sugar. In kind and combination of nutrients, colostrum is an indispensable food for newborns. It contains a large quantity of immune bodies and antitoxins, which protect the infant from the effects of pathogenic bacteria. In addition, it is a laxative and stimulates the normal activity of the digestive tract. In general, it helps the newborn adapt to extrauterine existence. Animal colostrum is not suitable for industrial processing; it clots quickly upon pasteurization and imparts an unpleasant flavor and poor storage potential to food products containing it. Human colostrum approaches the composition of normal milk by the third day or the end of the first week after labor; animal colostrum, after seven to ten days.

References in periodicals archive ?
For quarter foremilk samples, each teat end was again sanitized with swabs soaked in 70% ethanol and quarter foremilk samples collected aseptically as previously described by National Mastitis Council (1990).
Quarter foremilk samples (0.01 mL) were streaked onto one quadrant of esculin blood agar plate as described by National Mastitis Council (1990).
Determination of Comparative Contemporaneous Association Between Streak and Intramammary Infections in Cows and Buffaloes Contemporaneous association as used in the context of the present study referred to co-occurrence of a specific microorganism in streak canal swab and quarter foremilk sample of a particular teat simultaneously (Muhammad, 1992; Quirk et al., 2012).
Of the 80 quarter foremilk samples of 20 cows subjected to microbiological examination, 44 (55%) yielded growth of one or more than one microbial species (Table 2).
Table 2: Comparative prevalence of microorganisms recovered from quarter foremilk samples of cows and dairy buffaloes
Scrutiny of comparative contemporaneous association (defined in the context of the present study as co-occurrence of a microorganism in streak canal swab and quarter foremilk sample) of streak canal organisms with the intramammary organisms in cows and buffaloes revealed that recovery of 44 and 27 isolates, respectively in cows and buffaloes was common to both streak canal swab and quarter foremilk samples (Table 3).
In cows (n=20), a total of 44 isolates belonging to 18 microbial categories were recovered simultaneously from streak canal swab and foremilk quarter samples.
In a comparable number (n = 20) of buffaloes sampled in the present study, 27 isolates of 15 microbial categories recovered from streak canal and quarter foremilk samples showed a contemporaneous association (identity).
(n=1) were recovered simultaneously from streak canal and quarter foremilk samples of 20 buffaloes.
aureus was the most frequent isolate recovered from quarter foremilk samples of cows accounting for 25.49% (n=13) of the total isolates (n=51) recovered from 80 quarter foremilk samples.
aureus was the most frequent isolate recovered from 80 foremilk quarters samples of each of cows and buffaloes.
Here, it is not only difficult to see what the first milk is like, but once these same hands, towels, or stanchion beds come into contact with contaminated foremilk, they can actually transmit bacteria to other animals during the milking process.